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04 Aug 2006
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£70.00
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9781403998941
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17 Jun 2009
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9780230580077
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DescriptionContentsAuthors

New Ethnicities and Language Use is a study of self-representations of their own patterns of language use of a group of 30 adolescents of mainly South Asian descent in West London. The study contributes to an analysis the nature of ethnicity amongst Britain's visible minorities at the turn of the century. The young people portrayed are living out British identities which go largely unrecognised, as dominant voices both inside and outside their communities seek to foreground and hold in place alternative positionings of them as principally Sikhs, Hindus and Muslims or as Indians, Pakistanis and Bangladeshis, or again as Panjabi, Gujarati, Hindi, and Urdu speakers. However, a significant number of these young people, while retaining both diasporic and local links with a variety of traditions derived from the Indian subcontinent, are nevertheless fundamentally shaped by an everyday low-key Britishness - a Britishness with new inflections. This sensibility marks them as Brasians.


Description

New Ethnicities and Language Use is a study of self-representations of their own patterns of language use of a group of 30 adolescents of mainly South Asian descent in West London. The study contributes to an analysis the nature of ethnicity amongst Britain's visible minorities at the turn of the century. The young people portrayed are living out British identities which go largely unrecognised, as dominant voices both inside and outside their communities seek to foreground and hold in place alternative positionings of them as principally Sikhs, Hindus and Muslims or as Indians, Pakistanis and Bangladeshis, or again as Panjabi, Gujarati, Hindi, and Urdu speakers. However, a significant number of these young people, while retaining both diasporic and local links with a variety of traditions derived from the Indian subcontinent, are nevertheless fundamentally shaped by an everyday low-key Britishness - a Britishness with new inflections. This sensibility marks them as Brasians.


Contents

Acknowledgements
Introduction
Researching Ethnicities and Cultures
Language Use and Ethnicity: Mapping the Terrain
New Ethnicities as Lived Experience
How You Talk is Who You Are
'My Culture', 'My Language', My Religion': Communities, Practices and Diasporas
Popular Culture, Ethnicities and Tastes
What is Brasian?
Appendices
Notes
Bibliography
Index


Authors

ROXY HARRIS is a Senior Lecturer in the School of Social Science and Public Policy at King's College London, UK. He has a particular interest in the relationships between language, power, ethnicity and culture and has researched, taught and published on these issues in London for many years.