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Wellington's Men in Australia
Peninsular War Veterans and the Making of Empire c.1820-40
 
 
Palgrave Macmillan
 
 
 
 
 
28 Apr 2011
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£67.00
|Hardback In Stock
  
9780230252301
||
 
 
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DescriptionContentsAuthors

During the Peninsular War, the latter part of the Napoleonic wars fought in Spain and Portugal between 1808-1814, many men were commissioned as officers, usually without purchase, into the British army and, at war's end, these men found themselves desperately looking for something to do. Peninsular War veterans, and their cohort, found New South Wales ideal: it was opening up for free emigrants, British army officers could obtain land grants, and they could obtain cheap convict labour to work the land. Christine Wright explores how these particular veterans had a profound impact on New South Wales (and other Australian colonies) at a time of expanded growth: how they were the nucleus of colonial power structures, that their social networks influenced the pattern of settlement, they had the latest technical skills in medicine, surveying, mapmaking and engineering and, more astonishingly, that they played a crucial role in the development of colonial art and literature.


Description

During the Peninsular War, the latter part of the Napoleonic wars fought in Spain and Portugal between 1808-1814, many men were commissioned as officers, usually without purchase, into the British army and, at war's end, these men found themselves desperately looking for something to do. Peninsular War veterans, and their cohort, found New South Wales ideal: it was opening up for free emigrants, British army officers could obtain land grants, and they could obtain cheap convict labour to work the land. Christine Wright explores how these particular veterans had a profound impact on New South Wales (and other Australian colonies) at a time of expanded growth: how they were the nucleus of colonial power structures, that their social networks influenced the pattern of settlement, they had the latest technical skills in medicine, surveying, mapmaking and engineering and, more astonishingly, that they played a crucial role in the development of colonial art and literature.


Contents

Series Foreword
Acknowledgements
Introduction
'Emigration is a matter of necessity': the Aftermath of the Peninsular War
'They make Ancestry': Peninsular War Veterans as Officers and Gentlemen
'We are in sight of each other': the Social Networks of Veterans
'Attached to the Protestant succession': the Religious Influence of Veterans
'An art which owes its perfection to war': Skills of Veterans
'With all the authority of European despots': Veterans as Men of Authority and Magistrates
'In the midst of the Goths': the Artistic and Literary Legacy of Veterans
'To pave the way for the free settler': British Soldiers on the Frontier
Conclusion
Appendix 1: Database of influential British army officers in the Australian colonies who were veterans of the Peninsular War, and their cohort
Appendix 2: Colonial careers of Peninsular War veterans, and their cohort
Select Bibliography






Authors

CHRISTINE WRIGHT  lives in New South Wales, and is a Visiting Fellow at the Australian National University, Canberra, where she completed her PhD on the impact of Peninsular War veterans on the Australian colonies. She has lectured, tutored and published in the fields of British and Australian history.