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09 Mar 2012
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09 Mar 2012
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DescriptionReviewsContentsAuthors

What does it mean to be a writer of Muslim heritage in the UK today? Is there such a thing as 'Muslim fiction'?

In a collection of revealing new interviews, Claire Chambers talks to writers including Tariq Ali, Ahdaf Soueif, Hanif Kureishi, and Abdulrazak Gurnah to discuss the impact that their Muslim heritage has had on their writing, and to argue that this body of writing is some of the most important and politically engaged fiction of recent years. From literary techniques and influences to the political and cultural debates that matter to Muslims in Britain and beyond - such as the hijab, the war on terror and the Rushdie affair - these thirteen interviews challenge the idea of a monolithic voice for Islam in Britain. Instead, together they paint a picture of the diversity of voices creating 'British Muslim fictions' which ultimately enriches the cultural, social and political landscape of contemporary Britain.


Description

What does it mean to be a writer of Muslim heritage in the UK today? Is there such a thing as 'Muslim fiction'?

In a collection of revealing new interviews, Claire Chambers talks to writers including Tariq Ali, Ahdaf Soueif, Hanif Kureishi, and Abdulrazak Gurnah to discuss the impact that their Muslim heritage has had on their writing, and to argue that this body of writing is some of the most important and politically engaged fiction of recent years. From literary techniques and influences to the political and cultural debates that matter to Muslims in Britain and beyond - such as the hijab, the war on terror and the Rushdie affair - these thirteen interviews challenge the idea of a monolithic voice for Islam in Britain. Instead, together they paint a picture of the diversity of voices creating 'British Muslim fictions' which ultimately enriches the cultural, social and political landscape of contemporary Britain.


Reviews

"The consistently engaging interviews within this collection will create a valuable reading list of some of the most acclaimed postcolonial novels of recent years. Chambers's dialogues with these writers offer a contextual basis for their texts in both politics and creative practice, and raise expectations for her next study." - Journal of Postcolonial Writing
 
"In recent years, numerous books focusing on the representation of British Muslims have been published . . . Rarely, however, have the voices of Muslims been at the forefront of these debates. Chambers' collection of interviews with some of Britain's most prominent authors of Muslim heritage seeks to address this imbalance . . . There is much to learn from these interviews, and it serves as a valuable introduction to an important part of Britain's contemporary literary landscape." - Ole Birk Laursen, Open University, UK
 
"Chambers has done a commendable job in bringing together writers of Muslim heritage with diverse backgrounds . . . The book is a valuable contribution to contemporary postcolonial scholarship and will prove useful for students and scholars alike." - Contemporary South Asia


Contents

Acknowledgements
Introduction
Tariq Ali
Fadia Faqir
Aamer Hussein
Leila Aboulela
Abdulrazak Gurnah
Nadeem Aslam
Tahmima Anam
Mohsin Hamid
Robin Yassin-Kassab
Kamila Shamsie
Hanif Kureishi
Ahdaf Soueif
Zahid Hussain
Conclusion
Endnotes
Bibliography
Index


Authors

Claire Chambers is Lecturer in Global Literatures at University of York, UK, and is an expert in contemporary South Asian writing in English and literary representations of British Muslims. Her research has been supported by grants from HEFCE, the AHRC and British Academy. She has published widely in such journals as Postcolonial Text, Crossings and Contemporary Women's Writing, and is Coeditor of the Journal of Commonwealth Literature.