Palgrave Macmillan Home
Login or Register    Shopping Basket Shopping Basket
Search 
 
 
 
 
Can Institutions Have Responsibilities?
 
   Enlarge Image
 
 
Can Institutions Have Responsibilities?
Collective Moral Agency and International Relations
 
Series: Global Issues
 
Palgrave Macmillan
 
 
 
 
 
11 Nov 2003
|
£82.00
|Hardback Print on Demand
  
9780333971291
||
 
 
03 Nov 2003
|
£29.50
|Paperback Print on Demand
  
9781403917201
||
 
 
eBooks ebook on Palgrave Connect ebook available via library subscriptions ebook on ebooks.com 
 
 


OrderHelpBox
                                                                                                                                              returns, payment and delivery


DescriptionContentsAuthors

Policy-makers, politicians, academics and the 'average person on the street' all tend to speak of formal organizations such as states, the UN and multinational corporations as bearing moral reponsibilities in international politics. We often refer to such bodies as having obligations to rescue, to feed or to provide membership to distant victims of, for example, violence, famine or persecution. If they fail to discharge these proposed duties, we condemn them. Can we coherently refer to institutions in international politics as bearers of moral burdens, or does moral agency only apply to individual human beings? As assumptions and assertions of duty and blame play such a prominent role in international politics - in supporting policies, condemning and condoning actions and placating publics - it is an important endeavour to question, clarify and perhaps correct these claims. Can Institutions have Responsibilities? aims to address and critically engage with this often implicitly invoked but under-theorized notion of institutions as bearers of moral burdens in international politics.


Description

Policy-makers, politicians, academics and the 'average person on the street' all tend to speak of formal organizations such as states, the UN and multinational corporations as bearing moral reponsibilities in international politics. We often refer to such bodies as having obligations to rescue, to feed or to provide membership to distant victims of, for example, violence, famine or persecution. If they fail to discharge these proposed duties, we condemn them. Can we coherently refer to institutions in international politics as bearers of moral burdens, or does moral agency only apply to individual human beings? As assumptions and assertions of duty and blame play such a prominent role in international politics - in supporting policies, condemning and condoning actions and placating publics - it is an important endeavour to question, clarify and perhaps correct these claims. Can Institutions have Responsibilities? aims to address and critically engage with this often implicitly invoked but under-theorized notion of institutions as bearers of moral burdens in international politics.


Contents

Introduction: Making Sense of 'Responsibility' in International Relations: Key Questions and Concepts; T.Erskine
PART I: IDENTIFYING MORAL AGENTS: STATES, GOVERNMENTS AND 'INTERNATIONAL SOCIETY'
Assigning Responsibilities to Institutional Moral Agents: The Case of States and Quasi-states; T. Erskine
Moral Responsibility and the Problem of Representing the State; D.Runciman
Moral Agency and International Society: Reflections on Norms, the UN, the Gulf War, and the Kosovo Campaign; C.Brown
PART II: OBSTACLES AND ALTERNATIVE QUESTIONS
Collective Moral Agency and the Political Process; F.V.Harbour
Constitutive Theory and Moral Accountability: Individuals, Institutions, and Dispersed Practices; M.Frost
When Agents Cannot Act: International Institutions as 'Moral Patients'; C.Navari
PART III: HARD CASES: ASSIGNING DUTIES
NATO and the Individual Soldier as Moral Agents with Reciprocal Duties: Imbalance in the Kosovo Campaign; P.Cornish & F.V.Harbour
The Anti-Sweatshop Movement: Constructing Corporate Moral Agency in the Global Apparel Industry; R.DeWinter
PART IV: HARD CASES: APPORTIONING BLAME
The Responsibility of Collective External Bystanders in Cases of Genocide: The French in Rwanda; D.Kroslak
The United Nations and the Fall of Srebrenica: Meaningful Responsibility and International Society; A.F.Lang, Jr.
PART V: CONCLUSIONS
On 'Good Global Governance', Institutional Design and the Practices of Moral Agency; N.Rengger
Global Justice: Aims, Arrangements and Responsibilities; C.Barry
Selected Bibliography
Index


Authors

TONI ERSKINE is Lecturer in International Politics at the University of Wales, Aberystwyth, UK. She was previously British Academy Postdoctoral Fellow at the Centre of International Studies, University of Cambridge. Dr Erskine is convenor of the British Academy Network on 'Ethics, Institutions and International Affairs' and associate editor of the journal International Relations. She has published work on 'institutional moral agency', the ethics of war and 'embedded cosmopolitanism'.