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The Language of Jury Trial
 
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The Language of Jury Trial
A Corpus-Aided Analysis of Legal-Lay Discourse
 
 
Palgrave Macmillan
 
 
 
 
 
01 Nov 2005
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£76.00
|Hardback Print on Demand
  
9781403942470
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eBooks ebook on Palgrave Connect ebook available via library subscriptions 
 
 


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DescriptionContentsAuthors

In an age of managerialism and professionalization, trial by jury might appear costly, inefficient and unprofessional, yet it is also one of the last democratic links between the legal system and ordinary people. Nowhere is that link more evident than in the language of lawyers and judges compelled to communicate their criminal cases or their legal instructions to lay juries. This is the first detailed analysis of the language of legal professionals in English jury trial, drawing on the largest and most representative corpus of official trial transcripts ever compiled. Chris Heffer analyses patterns of language use across hundreds of texts and develops a model of legal-lay communication based on strategic tension between narrative and scientific modes of reasoning. As well as providing descriptive and explanatory accounts of 'legal-lay discourse', the book makes a linguistic case for the survival of the lay jury against growing calls for professionalization.


Description

In an age of managerialism and professionalization, trial by jury might appear costly, inefficient and unprofessional, yet it is also one of the last democratic links between the legal system and ordinary people. Nowhere is that link more evident than in the language of lawyers and judges compelled to communicate their criminal cases or their legal instructions to lay juries. This is the first detailed analysis of the language of legal professionals in English jury trial, drawing on the largest and most representative corpus of official trial transcripts ever compiled. Chris Heffer analyses patterns of language use across hundreds of texts and develops a model of legal-lay communication based on strategic tension between narrative and scientific modes of reasoning. As well as providing descriptive and explanatory accounts of 'legal-lay discourse', the book makes a linguistic case for the survival of the lay jury against growing calls for professionalization.


Contents

List of Tables & Figures
Acknowledgements
Conventions
Introduction
PART 1: COMMUNICATION IN JURY TRIAL
Legal-Lay Discourse
Coming into Court
The Trial as Complex Genre
PART 2: WITNESS EXAMINATION
The Counsel as Narrator
The Counsel as Subject
PART 3: THE JUDGE'S SUMMING-UP
Directing the Jury
(Re)Viewing the Case
Conclusion
Appendices
Notes
References
Index


Authors

CHRIS HEFFER is a lecturer in the Centre for Language and Communication Research at Cardiff University, Wales, where he teaches forensic linguistics and language and culture.