Palgrave Macmillan Home
Login or Register    Shopping Basket Shopping Basket
Search 
 
 
 
 
Protestant Millennialism, Evangelicalism and Irish Society, 1790-2005
 
   Enlarge Image
 
 
Protestant Millennialism, Evangelicalism and Irish Society, 1790-2005
 
 
Palgrave Macmillan
 
 
 
 
 
11 Jul 2006
|
£100.00
|Hardback In Stock
  
9780230003491
||
 
 
eBooks ebook on Palgrave Connect ebook available via library subscriptions ebook on ebooks.com 
 
 


OrderHelpBox
                                                                                                                                              returns, payment and delivery


DescriptionContentsAuthors

This volume documents the evolution and impact of one of the most enduring sources and symbols of sectarian conflict in Ireland - Protestant millennialism. Its chapters chart the development of Irish evangelicalism from the 1798 rebellion to the end of the 'troubles', paying particular attention to its apocalyptic commitments - from the reactionary conservatism of the 'Bible Gentry' to the aggressive urban preaching of the Irish Church Missions; from the other-worldly mysticism of Plymouth Brethren to the confrontational political commitments of Ian Paisley. Protestant Millennialism, Evangelicalism and Irish Society, 1790-2005 documents the evolution of the apocalyptic imagination, its use on competing sides of sectarian and political divisions, and the means by which its Protestant centre of support moves from south to north, from the aristocracy to the working classes, and from millennial optimism to prophetic despair. The volume explores new sources and offers new conclusions, setting a new research agenda and emphasizing the vitality of religious discourse in Irish studies.


Description

This volume documents the evolution and impact of one of the most enduring sources and symbols of sectarian conflict in Ireland - Protestant millennialism. Its chapters chart the development of Irish evangelicalism from the 1798 rebellion to the end of the 'troubles', paying particular attention to its apocalyptic commitments - from the reactionary conservatism of the 'Bible Gentry' to the aggressive urban preaching of the Irish Church Missions; from the other-worldly mysticism of Plymouth Brethren to the confrontational political commitments of Ian Paisley. Protestant Millennialism, Evangelicalism and Irish Society, 1790-2005 documents the evolution of the apocalyptic imagination, its use on competing sides of sectarian and political divisions, and the means by which its Protestant centre of support moves from south to north, from the aristocracy to the working classes, and from millennial optimism to prophetic despair. The volume explores new sources and offers new conclusions, setting a new research agenda and emphasizing the vitality of religious discourse in Irish studies.


Contents

Preface and Acknowledgements
Notes on Contributors
A Glossary of Terms
Introduction: Antichrist in Ireland: Protestant Millennialism and Irish Studies; C.Gribben
Watchmen in Zion: Millennial Expectancy in Late Eighteenth-Century Ulster; M.Hill
The Bible Gentry: Evangelical Religion, Aristocracy, and the New Moral Order in the Early Nineteenth Century; I.Whelan
John Nelson Darby: Contexts and Perceptions; T.C.F.Stunt
'Come, Lord Jesus, Quickly Come!': The Writing and Thought of Edward Nangle, 1828-1862; T.J.Kelley
Battle Plans and Battlegrounds: Protestant Mission Activity in the Dublin Slums, 1840s-1880s; J.Prunty
The Uses and Interpretation of Prophecy in Irish Presbyterianism, 1850-1930; A.R.Holmes
'The Dreamy Mazes of Millenialism': William Graham and the Irish Presbyterian Mission to German Jews; N.M.Railton
Unionism and the Eschatological 'Fate of Ulster', 1921-2005; P.Mitchel
Conclusions; C.Gribben & A.R.Holmes
Index


Authors

CRAWFORD GRIBBEN is Lecturer in Renaissance Literature and Culture at the University of Manchester, UK. He is author of The Puritan Millennium: Literature and Theology, 1550-1682 (2000) and co-editor with T.C.F. Stunt of Prisoners of Hope? Aspects of Evangelical Millennialism in Scotland and Ireland, 1800-1880 (2005), and with Kenneth Newport of Expectations of the End: Contemporary Millennialism in Social and Historical Context (2006).

ANDREW R. HOLMES is a Research Fellow at the Institute of Irish Studies, Queen's University, Belfast, UK. He is author of The Shaping of Ulster Presbyterian Belief and Practice 1770-1840 (2006) and a number of articles on various aspects of the history of Irish Presbyterianism. He is currently working on Irish Presbyterian intellectual and cultural life in the Victorian and Edwardian period.