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Consumer Culture and Personal Finance
 
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Consumer Culture and Personal Finance
Money Goes to Market
 
 
Palgrave Macmillan
 
 
 
 
 
20 Jan 2010
|
£63.00
|Hardback Print on Demand
  
9780230008670
||
 
 
eBooks ebook on Palgrave Connect ebook available via library subscriptions ebook on ebooks.com 
 
 


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DescriptionContentsAuthors

British personal finance underwent a remarkable transformation over the last 30 years that saw money subjected to unprecedented marketing and advertising campaigns. Liberated by the state, the banking sector globalized selling mortgages, credit cards, and investments like bars of soap. Consumer credit secured its place within modern lifestyles. Consumer Culture and Personal Finance plumbs the roots of these changes from a cultural historical perspective. Analyzing political, press and popular culture accounts, changing regulatory and institutional environments reveals several profound contradictions. Competition brought more providers yet narrowed the traditionally diverse field of intuitional forms. The ideology of individual financial rights that motivated unprecedented credit expansion to previously excluded groups, particularly women, brought new economic disparity. Women bore disproportion blame for fears about rising consumer debt loads. Popular rhetoric fused credit to notions of freedom and hedonism, yet consumers reported feeling caged and anxious about their debt loads. The pilgrimage of money to market failed to fully deliver its promised economic salvation.


Description

British personal finance underwent a remarkable transformation over the last 30 years that saw money subjected to unprecedented marketing and advertising campaigns. Liberated by the state, the banking sector globalized selling mortgages, credit cards, and investments like bars of soap. Consumer credit secured its place within modern lifestyles. Consumer Culture and Personal Finance plumbs the roots of these changes from a cultural historical perspective. Analyzing political, press and popular culture accounts, changing regulatory and institutional environments reveals several profound contradictions. Competition brought more providers yet narrowed the traditionally diverse field of intuitional forms. The ideology of individual financial rights that motivated unprecedented credit expansion to previously excluded groups, particularly women, brought new economic disparity. Women bore disproportion blame for fears about rising consumer debt loads. Popular rhetoric fused credit to notions of freedom and hedonism, yet consumers reported feeling caged and anxious about their debt loads. The pilgrimage of money to market failed to fully deliver its promised economic salvation.


Contents

Introduction
Prudent Investment and Modest Consumption
Women, Home, Consumption, Lending and Ill Repute
Hire Purchase, Home Furnishings and the Cult of Domesticity
Gentlemanly Bankers Adopt a New Set of Manners
Big Bang Banking
The Press Takes on Personal Debt
Three Personal Finance Discourses
Personal Financial Identities in Psychology and Popular Literature
Conclusion
Bibliography



Authors

JACQUELINE BOTTERILL is Assistant Professor of Communication, Popular Culture and Film at Brock University, Canada. She is co-author of The Dynamics of Advertising (with Barry Richards and Iain MacRury), Social Communication in Advertising, (with William Leiss, Stephen Kline, Sut Jhally) along with numerous articles relating to the cultural analysis of marketing, promotion and economic processes.