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03 Apr 2008
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£65.00
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9780230020047
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DescriptionReviewsContentsAuthors

The Religions of the Book explores Christian perceptions of the complex relationship between the 'religions of the book' – Christianity, Islam and Judaism – from 1400 to 1660. This period defines the rise of the Islamic Ottoman and the Catholic Spanish Empires, each with rhetorical – if not actual – claims to global dominance, and the apocalyptic conflict between them. It is also a period in which Christianity and Islam were riven by schism, profoundly complicating notions of just and holy war. Similarly, the connections between Christianity and Judaism were subject to continual debate and a wide range of responses. These expansive and interdisciplinary essays question how Christianity was understood in relation to others 'of the book'; the comprehension of common religious narratives and geography; and the nature of their conflict and co-existence. This collection demonstrates how the interaction of these three religions is crucial for an understanding of the period 1400 to 1660.


Description

The Religions of the Book explores Christian perceptions of the complex relationship between the 'religions of the book' – Christianity, Islam and Judaism – from 1400 to 1660. This period defines the rise of the Islamic Ottoman and the Catholic Spanish Empires, each with rhetorical – if not actual – claims to global dominance, and the apocalyptic conflict between them. It is also a period in which Christianity and Islam were riven by schism, profoundly complicating notions of just and holy war. Similarly, the connections between Christianity and Judaism were subject to continual debate and a wide range of responses. These expansive and interdisciplinary essays question how Christianity was understood in relation to others 'of the book'; the comprehension of common religious narratives and geography; and the nature of their conflict and co-existence. This collection demonstrates how the interaction of these three religions is crucial for an understanding of the period 1400 to 1660.


Reviews

'...[a] compelling and innovative collection of essays.' - Mark Rankin, Modern Language Review
 
'...well worth reading...a welcome collection of essays on a diverse range of subjects.  The editors are to be congratulated for bringing them all together in this thought provoking publication.' - Insight Turkey
 
'...[an] insightful collection...' - Theological Book Review


Contents

List of Illustrations
Acknowledgements
Notes on Contributors
Chronology
Introduction: The Devil Citing Scripture: Christian Perceptions of the Religions of the Book; M.Dimmock & A.Hadfield 
Christian Antisemitism and Intermedial Experience in Late Medieval England; A.Bale
The Crusade of Varna, 1443-1445: What motivated the Crusaders?; C.Imber
'A Human Head to the Neck of a Horse': Hybridity, Monstrosity and Early Christian Conceptions of Muhammad and Islam; M.Dimmock
'Vile Interpretations' and 'Devilish Supplements': Jewish Exegesis and Linguistic Siege in Martin Luther's On the Jews and Their Lies (1543); R.Hallett
'Turks' and 'Christians': The Iconography of Possession in the Depiction of the Ottoman-Venetian-Hapsburg Frontiers, 1550-1689; P.Brummett
Confounding Babel: The Language of Religion in the English Revolution; M.Birchwood
'A Parallel Made with the Jewish Sanhedrin': Tolerating Jews and Jewish Precedents in the Early Modern Church and State; E.Glaser
Milton Among the Muslims; G.MacLean
Afterword; J.Brotton
Endnotes
Select Bibliography
Index


Authors

MATTHEW DIMMOCK is senior lecturer in English at the University of Sussex, UK. He is the author of New Turks: Dramatising Islam and the Ottomans in Early Modern England (2005) and editor of William Percy's Mahomet and his Heaven: a Critical Edition (2006). He is currently working on a book, Fabricating Muhammad: English Imaginings, 1400-1750.
 
ANDREW HADFIELD is Professor of English at the University of Sussex, UK. He is the author of numerous works on English Renaissance literature and culture, most recently, Shakespeare, Spenser, and the Matter of Britain (2003) and Shakespeare and Republicanism (2005). He has also edited (with Paul Hammond) Shakespeare and Renaissance Europe (2004).