Palgrave Macmillan Home
Login or Register    Shopping Basket Shopping Basket
Search 
 
 
 
 
The New Public Diplomacy
 
   Enlarge Image
 
 
The New Public Diplomacy
Soft Power in International Relations
Edited by Jan Melissen
 
 
Palgrave Macmillan
 
 
 
 
 
22 Nov 2005
|
£73.00
|Hardback Print on Demand
  
9781403945167
||
 
 
31 Jul 2007
|
£23.99
|Paperback Print on Demand
  
9780230535541
||
 
 
eBooks ebook on Palgrave Connect ebook available via library subscriptions ebook on ebooks.com 
 
 


OrderHelpBox
                                                                                                                                              returns, payment and delivery


DescriptionReviewsContentsAuthors

The events of 11th September 2001 triggered a global debate on public diplomacy. Managing the public perception of their state has become an issue in foreign ministries from all countries, ranging from Canada to New Zealand and from Argentina to Mongolia. Many ministries of foreign affairs now develop a public diplomacy policy of their own, and few would like to be caught out without at least paying lip-service to the latest fashion in the conduct of international relations. Their association with public diplomacy can be seen as a symptom of the rise of soft power in international relations or, at another level, as the effect of broader processes of change in diplomatic practice, calling for transparency and transnational collaboration. The new public diplomacy is thus much more than a technical instrument of foreign policy. It has in fact become part of the changing fabric of international relations. Both small and large countries, whether under democratic or authoritarian regimes, and including the most affluent and those that can be counted amoung the world's poorest nations have in recent years displayed a great interest in public diplomacy. Foreign publics now matter to practitioners in a way that was unthinkable 25 years ago. This book joins the debate on the new public diplomacy by analyzing it from a number of thematic and national angles.


Description

The events of 11th September 2001 triggered a global debate on public diplomacy. Managing the public perception of their state has become an issue in foreign ministries from all countries, ranging from Canada to New Zealand and from Argentina to Mongolia. Many ministries of foreign affairs now develop a public diplomacy policy of their own, and few would like to be caught out without at least paying lip-service to the latest fashion in the conduct of international relations. Their association with public diplomacy can be seen as a symptom of the rise of soft power in international relations or, at another level, as the effect of broader processes of change in diplomatic practice, calling for transparency and transnational collaboration. The new public diplomacy is thus much more than a technical instrument of foreign policy. It has in fact become part of the changing fabric of international relations. Both small and large countries, whether under democratic or authoritarian regimes, and including the most affluent and those that can be counted amoung the world's poorest nations have in recent years displayed a great interest in public diplomacy. Foreign publics now matter to practitioners in a way that was unthinkable 25 years ago. This book joins the debate on the new public diplomacy by analyzing it from a number of thematic and national angles.


Reviews


'The New Public Diplomacy has become one of the most frequently cited non-American titles on public diplomacy.' – Discussion Papers in Diplomacy
 
'This timely and fascinating book brings much needed scholarship to the global conversation on public diplomacy.' - Bruce Gregory, Director, Public Diplomacy Institute, George Washington University, USA

'The New Public Diplomacy is an excellent and original collection probing a topic at the heart of contemporary international relations.' - Nicholas J. Cull, Professor of Public Diplomacy, University of Southern California, USA

'Jan Melissen's book is a very valuable contribution to an increasingly important field of study. At a time when policymakers are still feeling their way towards an understanding of soft power and public diplomacy, Prof. Melissen and his distinguished colleagues ask - and convincingly answer - some pressing questions.' - Philip Fiske de Gouveia, Senior Research Associate, Public Diplomacy Programme, The Foreign Policy Centre

'Public Diplomacy, this striking departure from the old foreign policy rituals of confidential interaction behind closed doors, has become widely recognized and enacted by practitioners, but so far, has not been written about extensively in academic literature. Jan Melissen's book fills this gap and should find the interest of those who practice and those who study diplomacy.' - Ambassador Karl Th. Paschke, author of the so-called 'Paschke Report'

'[This] is a quarry from which the materials for much interesting work on the subject can be cut and a most useful addition to the literature.' - Political Studies Review



Contents

Notes on Contributors
Acknowledgements
Introduction; J.Melissen
PART I: THE NEW ENVIRONMENT
The New Public Diplomacy: Between Theory and Practice; J.Melissen
Rethinking the 'New' Public Diplomacy; B.Hocking
PART II: SHIFTING PERSPECTIVES
Power, Public Diplomacy and the Pax Americana; P.van Ham
Niche Diplomacy in the World Public Arena: The Global 'Corners' of Canada and Norway; A.K.Henrikson
Public Diplomacy in the People's Republic of China; I.d'Hooghe
Revolutionary States, Outlaw Regimes and the Techniques of Public Diplomacy; P.Sharp
The EU as a Soft Power: The Force of Persuasion; A.Michalski
PART III: IMPROVING PRACTICE
Culture Communicates: US Diplomacy that Works; C.P.Schneider
Making a National Brand; W.Olins
Dialogue-Based Public Diplomacy: A New Foreign Policy Paradigm?; S.Riordan
Training for Public Diplomacy: An Evolutionary Perspective; J.Hemery
Index


Authors

JAN MELISSEN is Director of the Clingendael Diplomatic Studies Programme (CDSP), Netherlands Institute of International Relations 'Clingendael', in The Hague, and Professor of Diplomacy in the Department of Politics at Antwerp University, Belgium. He is Co-Editor of The Hague Journal of Diplomacy. His previous book with Palgrave Macmillan is Innovation in Diplomatic Practice (1999).