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29 May 2009
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£60.00
|Hardback Print on Demand
  
9780230202139
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eBooks ebook on Palgrave Connect ebook available via library subscriptions ebook on ebooks.com 
 
 


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DescriptionReviewsContentsAuthors

This ambitious, agenda-setting study considers the origins of sociable life from a microontological perspective. More specifically, it suggests ways of engaging with bacteria in other-than pathogen characterization. We know much more about living organisms "big-like-us" than we do about those organisms which originated life on Earth and sustain the biosphere through complex symbiotic and recycling relationships. This book details scientific research on bacterial capabilities such as perception, communication, community organization and symbiosis. It critically analyzes evolutionary theories about the development of the species (including neo-Darwinism, epigenetics and symbiogenesis). It also draws on bio-philosophical discussions of sexual difference, identity, environmentalism and ethics, providing a transdisciplinary framework with which to engage the social and natural sciences together to recognise bacterial liveliness in structuring social relations.


Description

This ambitious, agenda-setting study considers the origins of sociable life from a microontological perspective. More specifically, it suggests ways of engaging with bacteria in other-than pathogen characterization. We know much more about living organisms "big-like-us" than we do about those organisms which originated life on Earth and sustain the biosphere through complex symbiotic and recycling relationships. This book details scientific research on bacterial capabilities such as perception, communication, community organization and symbiosis. It critically analyzes evolutionary theories about the development of the species (including neo-Darwinism, epigenetics and symbiogenesis). It also draws on bio-philosophical discussions of sexual difference, identity, environmentalism and ethics, providing a transdisciplinary framework with which to engage the social and natural sciences together to recognise bacterial liveliness in structuring social relations.


Reviews


'Myra J. Hird provides a highly engaging and energetic account of contemporary scientific debates about microbes, detailing how they challenge mainstream understandings of evolution, identity, sex and ecology. Most importantly, she articulates why social scientists, feminists and queer theorists should pay careful attention to our inextricable entanglements with the microcosmos. Her enthusiasm for her subject matter is infectious.' - Celia Roberts, Department of Sociology, Lancaster University, UK

 
'This book is an exciting and inviting account of the messy entanglements and inventions of the world's tiny beings, those entities that shape scale upon scale of sociable living for all on the earth. Myra Hird's book is richly researched and beautifully written, and it fulfills my appetite for an account of biology and biologists to live with and for. Hird shows how "thinking with microorganisms"-and with their scientists - can be a fundamental practice for living well in multispecies, mortal worlds.'
- Donna Haraway, Distinguished Professor, History of Consciousness Department, UC Santa Cruz, USA


Contents

Introduction
After War
Plenty of Room at the Bottom: Thinking (With) Bacteria
Evolutionary Theory and its Discontents
Microontologies of Self
Microontologies of Sex
Microontologies of Ecology
Eating Well, Surviving Humanism
Bibliography


Authors

MYRA J. HIRD is Professor and Queen's National Scholar at Queen's University, Canada. Her research and teaching interests span the areas of science studies, health, the ontology and epistemology of sexual difference, sexuality, ethics and social justice, violence, disability studies, feminist theory and queer theory. She is the author of Sociology of Science: A Critical Canadian Introduction, Sex, Gender and Science and Engendering Violence: From Childhood to Adulthood, as well as three co-edited collections, including Queering the (Non-)Human, Questioning Sociology: Canadian Perspectives and Sociology for the Asking.