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Digesting Race, Class, and Gender
 
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Digesting Race, Class, and Gender
Sugar as a Metaphor
 
 
Palgrave Macmillan
 
 
 
 
 
 
19 Jan 2011
|
£60.00
|Hardback In Stock
  
9780230600935
||
 
 
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DescriptionContentsAuthors

How are the ways that race organizes our lives related to the ways gender and class organize our lives? How might these organizing mechanisms conflict or work together? In Digesting Race, Class, and Gender, Ivy Ken likens race, class, and gender to foods - foods that are produced in fields, mixed together in bowls, and digested in our social and institutional bodies. In the field, one food may contaminate another through cross-pollination. In the mixing bowl, each food's original molecular structure changes in the presence of others. And within a meal, the presence of one food may impede or facilitate the digestion of another. At each of these sites, the "foods" of race, class, and gender are involved in dynamic relationships with each other that have implications for the shape - or the taste - of our social order.    


Description

How are the ways that race organizes our lives related to the ways gender and class organize our lives? How might these organizing mechanisms conflict or work together? In Digesting Race, Class, and Gender, Ivy Ken likens race, class, and gender to foods - foods that are produced in fields, mixed together in bowls, and digested in our social and institutional bodies. In the field, one food may contaminate another through cross-pollination. In the mixing bowl, each food's original molecular structure changes in the presence of others. And within a meal, the presence of one food may impede or facilitate the digestion of another. At each of these sites, the "foods" of race, class, and gender are involved in dynamic relationships with each other that have implications for the shape - or the taste - of our social order.    


Contents

PART I: RACE, CLASS, AND GENDER AS ORGANIZING PRINCIPLES Introduction Race, Class, and Gender:  What They Are, What They Do PART II: USING FOOD TO IDENTIFY RELATIONSHIPS AMONG RACE, CLASS, AND GENDER Digesting Race, Class, and Gender Producing Race, Class, and Gender Baking Race, Class, and Gender Tasting Race, Class, and Gender PART III: SEARCHING FOR EVIDENCE OF RELATIONSHIPS AT SPECIFIC SITES The Multi-Relational Character of Race, Class, and Gender


Authors

IVY KEN Assistant Professor of Sociology at George Washington University, USA.