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The Disarmament of Hatred
 
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The Disarmament of Hatred
Marc Sangnier, French Catholicism and the Legacy of the First World War, 1914-45
 
 
Palgrave Macmillan
 
 
 
 
 
 
29 Mar 2012
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£63.00
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9780230218253
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DescriptionContentsAuthors

The Ruhr invasion of 1923 prolonged the antagonism of the First World War between France and Germany. Challenging this rhetoric of enmity from 1921, French veteran and Catholic politician Marc Sangnier angered many by inviting the 'enemy' to Paris. Through his audacious Peace Congresses, Sangnier placed himself at the centre of a broader European civic campaign for moral disarmament or the 'disarmament of hatred'. European détente after 1924 lent currency to such staged reconciliation and crossing of borders. Mining a variety of sources, both known and new, Gearóid Barry documents the Peace Congresses' surprising resonance and political ecumenism (embracing Quakers, secularists, socialists and the pope) while reconfiguring the transnational histories of youth movements, women's peace activism and Christian Democracy. Pledged to reject 'war culture', these peace activists shared excruciating new choices between peace and appeasement in the 1930s. This story casts new light on key questions in European history in the era of two World Wars.


Description

The Ruhr invasion of 1923 prolonged the antagonism of the First World War between France and Germany. Challenging this rhetoric of enmity from 1921, French veteran and Catholic politician Marc Sangnier angered many by inviting the 'enemy' to Paris. Through his audacious Peace Congresses, Sangnier placed himself at the centre of a broader European civic campaign for moral disarmament or the 'disarmament of hatred'. European détente after 1924 lent currency to such staged reconciliation and crossing of borders. Mining a variety of sources, both known and new, Gearóid Barry documents the Peace Congresses' surprising resonance and political ecumenism (embracing Quakers, secularists, socialists and the pope) while reconfiguring the transnational histories of youth movements, women's peace activism and Christian Democracy. Pledged to reject 'war culture', these peace activists shared excruciating new choices between peace and appeasement in the 1930s. This story casts new light on key questions in European history in the era of two World Wars.


Contents

List of Figures
Acknowledgements
Introduction
Marc Sangnier's War, 1914-1919
Demobilization and Politics, 1919-1921
'The traitor in Berlin' : Paris, Germany and Austria, 1921-22
From Pragmatist to Dove: Freiburg-im-Breisgau, 1923
Pacem in terris : Politics, Theology and Cultural Demobilization, 1924-25
Bierville and the Liturgy of Peace, 1926
Crusade of Youth, 1927-32
Sangnier and the PacifistConundrum, 1932-45
Conclusion
Appendix: A International Democratic Peace Congresses, 1921-32
Bibliography
Index


Authors

GEARÓID BARRY is a College Lecturer in Modern European History at NUI Galway, Ireland. He has published several articles on France and the Ruhr crisis of 1923, the militarization of youth and the papacy and Christian Democracy. His current project looks at pacifism in Europe and America in transnational perspective.