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Energy for the Future
 
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Energy for the Future
A New Agenda
 
 
Palgrave Macmillan
 
 
 
 
 
12 Feb 2009
|
£80.00
|Hardback Print on Demand
  
9780230221512
||
 
 
12 Feb 2009
|
£22.99
|Paperback Print on Demand
  
9780230221529
||
 
 
eBooks ebook on Palgrave Connect ebook available via library subscriptions ebook on ebooks.com 
 
 


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DescriptionContentsAuthors

Cutting carbon emissions is urgent, but energy policy is also concerned with security, efficiency and access. In the transition to sustainable energy, developing the necessary fuels, technologies and policies will strain many energy policy orthodoxies. Energy for the Future analyzes the changing contexts and fault lines, and proposes ways forward that are both politically viable and likely to be effective.

Part I explains how and why the energy policy agenda is changing in rich democracies, focusing on:
• climate change and other international agendas;
• discourses, ideologies and governance; and
• technological 'lock-in'.

Part II proposes new approaches in the areas of:
• technology appraisals and policy reviews;
• carbon trading and market regulation; and
• facilitating action by citizens and developing countries to reduce emissions.

Part III provides a succinct overview of the conclusions and the implications for governments as energy policy enters this new and challenging phase.


Description

Cutting carbon emissions is urgent, but energy policy is also concerned with security, efficiency and access. In the transition to sustainable energy, developing the necessary fuels, technologies and policies will strain many energy policy orthodoxies. Energy for the Future analyzes the changing contexts and fault lines, and proposes ways forward that are both politically viable and likely to be effective.

Part I explains how and why the energy policy agenda is changing in rich democracies, focusing on:
• climate change and other international agendas;
• discourses, ideologies and governance; and
• technological 'lock-in'.

Part II proposes new approaches in the areas of:
• technology appraisals and policy reviews;
• carbon trading and market regulation; and
• facilitating action by citizens and developing countries to reduce emissions.

Part III provides a succinct overview of the conclusions and the implications for governments as energy policy enters this new and challenging phase.


Contents

Foreword; S.Stagl
PART I: THE ENERGY POLICY AGENDA
Introduction: Climate Policy is Energy Policy; I.Scrase, T.Wang, G.MacKerron, F.McGowan& S.Sorrell
International Regimes for Energy: Finding the Right Level for Policy; F.McGowan
Energy Issues: Framing and Policy Change; I.Scrase& D.Ockwell
Energy Governance: The Challenges of Sustainability; A.Smith
Lessons from the UK on Urgency and Legitimacy in Energy Policy-Making; G.MacKerron
Lock-In; I.Scrase& G.MacKerron
PART II: TOWARDS A NEW AGENDA
Deliberative Socio-Technical Transitions; M.Lehtonen& F.Kern
Technology Assessment and Innovation Policy; J.Watson
Distributed Generation: Transforming the Electricity Network; R.Sauter& D.Bauknecht
Energy and the Citizen; M.Martiskainen& J.Watson
Carbon Trading; S.Sorrell
Global Energy Solutions?; F.McGowan, D.Ockwell, G.MacKerron, J.Watson, M.Lehtonen& I.Scrase
PART III: CONCLUSIONS AND POLICY IMPLICATIONS
Conclusions: Transitions, Governance and Appraisal; I.Scrase, D.Bauknecht, F.Kern, M.Lehtonen, G.MacKerron, M.Martiskainen, F.McGowan, D.Ockwell, R.Sauter, A.Smith, S.Sorrell, T.Wang& J.Watson
Energy Policy Implications; I.Scrase, F.Kern, M.Lehtonen, G.MacKerron, M.Martiskainen, F.McGowan, D.Ockwell, R.Sauter, A.Smith, S.Sorrell, T.Wang& J.Watson
Afterword: Sustainable Energy - The Challenge of Choice; A.Stirling


Authors

IVAN SCRASE works on policy framings, appraisals and change in the areas of carbon abatement, energy efficiency, bioenergy and flood risk management. He trained at Oxford, UK (BA) and Imperial College London (MSc, PhD), and has worked in academia, the NGO sector and environmental consultancy.

GORDON MACKERRON is an economist who works on energy policy and economics, especially the trade-offs between policy objectives, as well as on electricity issues, especially nuclear power policy. He has worked in government and consultancy as well as academia and chaired the UK Government Committee on Radioactive Waste Management.