Palgrave Macmillan Home
Login or Register    Shopping Basket Shopping Basket
Search 
 
 
 
 
Headhunting and Colonialism
 
   Enlarge Image
 
 
Headhunting and Colonialism
Anthropology and the Circulation of Human Skulls in the Portuguese Empire, 1870-1930
 
 
Palgrave Macmillan
 
 
 
 
 
22 Jan 2010
|
£78.00
|Hardback Print on Demand
  
9780230222052
||
 
 
eBooks ebook on Palgrave Connect ebook available via library subscriptions ebook on ebooks.com 
 
 


OrderHelpBox
                                                                                                                                              returns, payment and delivery


DescriptionReviewsContentsAuthors

Headhunting and Colonialism is an account of colonial violence, indigenous headhunting and the circulation of human skulls to anthropological museums in the heyday of late European imperialism. Using the example of the Portuguese colony of East Timor, it embeds the history of a museum collection of human skulls within the larger context of the Portuguese imperial expansion, emergence of scientific anthropology in Europe, Christian beliefs about the dead body, and indigenous cultures. The book examines how human skulls were critical to imperial power and indigenous communities, and traces how they could be collected, exchanged, circulated, studied, and interpreted in colonial, scientific, and metropolitan contexts. By combining imperial history with historical anthropology and the history of science, it brings out a fresh reappraisal of colonial interactions as mutually parasitic, and a novel framework for understanding the social life of collections as attachments between things and histories.


Description

Headhunting and Colonialism is an account of colonial violence, indigenous headhunting and the circulation of human skulls to anthropological museums in the heyday of late European imperialism. Using the example of the Portuguese colony of East Timor, it embeds the history of a museum collection of human skulls within the larger context of the Portuguese imperial expansion, emergence of scientific anthropology in Europe, Christian beliefs about the dead body, and indigenous cultures. The book examines how human skulls were critical to imperial power and indigenous communities, and traces how they could be collected, exchanged, circulated, studied, and interpreted in colonial, scientific, and metropolitan contexts. By combining imperial history with historical anthropology and the history of science, it brings out a fresh reappraisal of colonial interactions as mutually parasitic, and a novel framework for understanding the social life of collections as attachments between things and histories.


Reviews

'The scanty information about the skulls was not a limitation but a challenge for the Portuguese historian Ricardo Roque, who performs detective work of the skulls' trajectory to explore Portuguese colonialism, violence, collecting practices and anthropology.'

- Fenneke Sisling, Bijdragen tot de Taal-, Land- en Volkenkunde


'Roque's Headhunting and Colonialism provides a stimulating and well-conceptualized read. His integration of primary research with theoretical outlooks throws light on historical topics that have generally been neglected in Pacific research. Portugal and Portuguese colonialism in East Timor have received only marginal consideration in historical research. His book thus figures as an important contribution to the fields of colonialism and ethno-geography in the Pacific.'
 
- Rainer F. Buschmann, The Bulletin of the Pacific Circle

'The book is particularly timely in that it provides an excellent case study of the historical processes that may confuse efforts to determine the provenance of human remains, reminding us of the need for close investigation of provenance before any research or repatriation activities are commenced. […] It should be recommended reading for anyone involved in the museum management of human remains and, in particular, for those involved in repatriation.'

- Michael Pickering, The Journal of Pacific History


Contents

Illustrations& Maps
Abbreviations
Glossary
Acknowledgements
Introduction
PART I: ENCOUNTERS WITH PARASITES
Parasitism in Colonial Interactions
The Order of Ceremonial Government
The Circulatory System of Colonial Headhunting
PART II: SKULLS AND HISTORIES
Trajectories of Human Skulls in Museum Collections
Human Skulls as Anthropological Objects
Histories and Classification in Timorese Anthropology
Collecting and the Dramas of Colonial Hostility
Conclusion
Notes
Bibliography
Index


Authors

RICARDO ROQUE is Research Fellow at the Institute of Social Sciences, University of Lisbon, Portugal, and Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the University of Sydney, Australia. He works on the history and anthropology of colonialism, human sciences, and cross-cultural contact in the Portuguese-speaking world. He has published extensively on crime and rebellion in British India, including Thuggee: Banditry and the British in Early Nineteenth-Century India (2007) and The Great Fear of 1857: Rumours, Conspiracies and the Making of the Indian Uprising (2010).