Palgrave Macmillan Home
Login or Register    Shopping Basket Shopping Basket
Search 
 
 
 
 
The Social Sciences and Democracy
 
   Enlarge Image
 
 
The Social Sciences and Democracy
Edited by Jeroen Van Bouwel
 
 
Palgrave Macmillan
 
 
 
 
 
05 Nov 2009
|
£66.00
|Hardback In Stock
  
9780230224391
||
 
 
eBooks ebook on Palgrave Connect ebook available via library subscriptions ebook on ebooks.com 
 
 


OrderHelpBox
                                                                                                                                              returns, payment and delivery


DescriptionContentsAuthors

How democratic are the social sciences? Can and should they be more so – what are the promises, what the obstacles? It has been taken for granted that the social sciences benefit everyone, but are all interests served equally well? Can the idea of democracy clarify what goes on in social science between competing approaches? The relation between the social sciences and democracy is one of many questions, not only concerning the democratic quality of social science. This book deals as well with the role social scientists (should) play in (improving) democracies – as technocrat, expertocrat or democrat – and on how to facilitate the relation between the epistemic and the political, discussing the question of what governance of social science is to be preferred? Prominent researchers from both philosophy of science and the social studies of science tackle these questions highlighting the epistemic, political, social and economic interests at stake.


Description

How democratic are the social sciences? Can and should they be more so – what are the promises, what the obstacles? It has been taken for granted that the social sciences benefit everyone, but are all interests served equally well? Can the idea of democracy clarify what goes on in social science between competing approaches? The relation between the social sciences and democracy is one of many questions, not only concerning the democratic quality of social science. This book deals as well with the role social scientists (should) play in (improving) democracies – as technocrat, expertocrat or democrat – and on how to facilitate the relation between the epistemic and the political, discussing the question of what governance of social science is to be preferred? Prominent researchers from both philosophy of science and the social studies of science tackle these questions highlighting the epistemic, political, social and economic interests at stake.


Contents

Notes on Contributors
Where the Epistemic and the Political Meet: An Introduction to the Social Sciences and Democracy; J.Van Bouwel
PART I: DEMOCRATIZING THE SOCIAL SCIENCES: BALANCING EXPERTISE AND DIALOGUE
Social Sciences and the Democratic Ideal: From Technocracy to Dialogue; P.Baert, H.Mateus Jerónimo& A.Shipman
Stakeholders or Experts? On the Ambiguous Implications of Public Participation in Science; S.Solomon
Scientific Knowledge: A Stakeholder Theory; K.Rolin
PART II: THE SOCIAL SCIENCES IMPROVING DEMOCRATIC THEORY AND PRACTICE
Improving Democratic Practice: Practical Social Science and Normative Ideals; J.Bohman
Fact and Value in Democratic Theory; H.Kincaid
PART III: DEMOCRATIC THEORY ELUCIDATING SOCIAL SCIENTIFIC THEORY AND PRACTICE
The Problem With(Out) Consensus: The Scientific Consensus, Deliberative Democracy and Agonistic Pluralism; J.Van Bouwel
Joint Commitment, Coercion and Freedom in Science - Conceptual Analysis and Case Studies; A.Bouvier
PART IV: THE DEMOCRATIC GOVERNANCE OF SOCIAL SCIENCE
Public Sociology and Democratic Theory; S.P.Turner
Varieties of Democracy in Science Policy; E.Weber
Some Economists Rush to Rescue Science From Politics, Only to Discover in Their Haste, They Went to the Wrong Address; P.Mirowski
PART V: (FUTURE) OBSTACLES TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES AND DEMOCRACY
Fuller and Mirowski on the Commercialization of Scientific Knowledge; F.Remedios
Humanity: The Always Already – or Never to be – Object of the Social Sciences?; S.Fuller
Index


Authors

JEROEN VAN BOUWEL is a Fellow of the Research Foundation – Flanders, working at the Centre for Logic and Philosophy of Science, Ghent University, Belgium. His main areas of research are philosophy of the social sciences, social epistemology and general philosophy of science, especially the conundrum of scientific pluralism.