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Reconstructing Development Theory
 
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Reconstructing Development Theory
International Inequality, Institutional Reform and Social Emancipation
 
 
Palgrave Macmillan
 
 
 
 
 
08 Jul 2009
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£70.00
|Hardback In Stock
  
9780230229808
||
 
 
08 Jul 2009
|
£27.99
|Paperback In Stock
  
9780230229815
||
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DescriptionReviewsContentsAuthors

The book provides a systematic assessment of the evolution of development theory, its relationship to orthodox social science analysis and the liberal pluralistic orthodoxy that now dominates the mainstream approach to international development, showing how we can transcend its failure to address some key problems of late and uneven development


Description

The book provides a systematic assessment of the evolution of development theory, its relationship to orthodox social science analysis and the liberal pluralistic orthodoxy that now dominates the mainstream approach to international development, showing how we can transcend its failure to address some key problems of late and uneven development


Reviews

'This work is a remarkable intellectual achievement, synthesizing sociological, economic and political grand theory with global history over the last couple of centuries, and applying the result to a persuasive reconstruction of development analysis.' - M. Crawford Young, University of Wisconsin-Madison, USA

'By reasserting the centrality of development theory to understanding and, more importantly, countering the current dismal realities of global poverty and inequality, this breathtakingly erudite book constitutes a much-needed antidote to the superficiality of much that is currently written about development policy and practice.' – David Lewis, London School of Economics.

`In this ambitious and persuasive tour de force, Teddy Brett offers a new synthetic paradigm that transcends the limits of both structuralist and neo-liberal theory. It gives new life to development theory and is an important contribution to the revitalization of development studies.' Edward Webster, University of the Witwatersrand

'[C]lear, insightful, and innovative – [this book] will certainly spark several debates… [and] will surely appeal to Latin American audiences.' – Francisco Gutiérrez Sanín, Universidad Nacional de Colombia

'Since its inception, development theory has constantly searched for one 'master' concept to explain both development and underdevelopment. Such concepts have, however, flattened out the historically shaped experiences of different countries. This work, focussing as it does on specific contexts and trajectories, makes an invaluable contribution to the debate, and guides it in another direction.' – Neera Chandhoke, University of Delhi


Contents

Preface
Introduction Reconstructing Development Theory for the 21st Century
PART I: THE NATURE OF DEVELOPMENT THEORY
The Crisis in Development Theory
The Analytical Assumptions of Development Theory
Evolutionary Institutional Change and Developmental Transitions
PART II: THE LIBERAL INSTITUTIONAL PLURALIST CONSENSUS
Market Societies, Open Systems and Institutional Pluralism
State Regulation, Democratic Politics and Accountable Governance
Politics and Public Management
The Nature and Organisation of Capitalist Firms
The Nature and Role of Solidaristic Organizations
PART III: BEYOND LIBERAL PLURALISM: RECONSTRUCTING DEVELOPMENT THEORY
The Political Economy of Structural Change
Developmental Transitions: Learning from History
Explaining Blocked Development
The Social Theory of Developmental Transformations
Building Strong States
Building Capitalist Economies
Conclusion: Theory, Agency and Developmental Transitions


Authors

E A BRETT is Senior Visiting Fellow, Development Studies Institute, LSE and formerly Visiting Professor, School of Humanities and Social Science, Witwatersrand University, South Africa.