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An Islamic Court in Context
 
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An Islamic Court in Context
An Ethnographic Study of Judicial Reasoning
 
 
Palgrave Macmillan
 
 
 
 
 
 
18 Dec 2009
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£66.00
|Hardback Out of Stock
  
9780230617407
||
 
 
eBooks ebook on Palgrave Connect ebook available via library subscriptions ebook on ebooks.com 
 
 


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DescriptionReviewsContentsAuthors

Stiles utilizes in-depth ethnographic study of judicial reasoning and litigant activity in Islamic family court in Zanzibar, Tanzania to draw new and important conclusions on how people understand and use Islamic legal ideas in marital disputes.


Description

Stiles utilizes in-depth ethnographic study of judicial reasoning and litigant activity in Islamic family court in Zanzibar, Tanzania to draw new and important conclusions on how people understand and use Islamic legal ideas in marital disputes.


Reviews

"Through richly detailed and beautifully narrated cases Stiles presents a deeply humanistic account of a contemporary Islamic legal system. Concentrating on Zanzibar, she demonstrates how women in particular navigate a religiously affiliated system, and in the process she brings an entire society to life. With her insightful interpretation of a legal environment that governs one-fifth of the planet and about which Westerners continue to posses far too simplistic a view she makes a signal contribution to the literature." - Lawrence Rosen, Cromwell Professor of Anthropology, Princeton University and author of Varieties of Muslim Experience

"Stiles provides one of the few in-depth looks at how a contemporary Islamic judge deals with divorce. She describes in vivid detail how women and men negotiate in a Zanzibar court, and the way an ordinary judge must draw on his study of the Qur’an, his knowledge of state law, and his keen sense of the complexities of social life to resolve often bitter disputes. This book is at once a major work in legal anthropology and a rich example of the very best in social studies of contemporary Islam." - John R. Bowen, Dunbar-Van Cleve Professor in Arts and Sciences, Washington University in St. Louis


Contents

Introduction: Kahdi, Court, and Anthropologist Writing a Case: Court Actors and Court Procedure From Community to Court: Gendered Experience of Divorce Allegations of Repudiation: Determining Intention in Disputed Divorce Witnessing and Authority in the Court: Elders, Shaykhs, and Shehas Money Matters: Khului Divorce in Context Conclusion: The Court is a Hospital


Authors

ERIN E. STILES is Assistant Professor of Anthropology at California State University, USA.