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The Eighteenth-Century Composite State
 
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The Eighteenth-Century Composite State
Representative Institutions in Ireland and Europe, 1689-1800
 
 
Palgrave Macmillan
 
 
 
 
 
13 May 2010
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£67.00
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9780230231597
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DescriptionContentsAuthors

This pioneering exploration of the phenomenon of the composite state in Eighteenth-century Europe employs a comparative approach to sustain the case for the inclusion of Ireland within this interpretative framework. Written by acknowledged experts, the collection uniquely combines the findings of new research on Ireland with broader syntheses of some of the major composite states of Europe. With accounts of the pays d'etat of Burgundy (Julian Swann) and Languedoc (Stephen J. Miller) in France, on the Hungarian diet and Austria (Orsolya Szakály) and Poland-Lithuania (Richard Butterwick), and of Irish confessional (James Kelly, David Hayton), financial (C.I. McGrath), improving (Andrew Sneddon) and security (Neal Garnham) legislation, as well as a reflective introduction and conclusion setting the essays in their wider historical and interpretative context, this collection both amplifies understanding of the nature of the European composite state and of the deliberations of the Irish parliament. This book will be of particular interest to scholars and students of eighteenth-century European and Irish history.


Description

This pioneering exploration of the phenomenon of the composite state in Eighteenth-century Europe employs a comparative approach to sustain the case for the inclusion of Ireland within this interpretative framework. Written by acknowledged experts, the collection uniquely combines the findings of new research on Ireland with broader syntheses of some of the major composite states of Europe. With accounts of the pays d'etat of Burgundy (Julian Swann) and Languedoc (Stephen J. Miller) in France, on the Hungarian diet and Austria (Orsolya Szakály) and Poland-Lithuania (Richard Butterwick), and of Irish confessional (James Kelly, David Hayton), financial (C.I. McGrath), improving (Andrew Sneddon) and security (Neal Garnham) legislation, as well as a reflective introduction and conclusion setting the essays in their wider historical and interpretative context, this collection both amplifies understanding of the nature of the European composite state and of the deliberations of the Irish parliament. This book will be of particular interest to scholars and students of eighteenth-century European and Irish history.


Contents

Introduction: The Irish Parliament in European Context: a Representative Institution in a Composite State; D.W.Hayton & J.Kelly
Money, Politics and Power: the Financial Legislation of the Irish Parliament; C.I.McGrath
Sustaining a Confessional State: the Irish Parliament and Catholicism; J.Kelly
Parliament and the Established Church: Reform and Reaction; D.W.Hayton
Defending the Kingdom and Preserving the Constitution: Reform of the Militia; N.Garnham
Legislating for Economic Development: Irish Fisheries as a Case-Study in the Limitations of 'improvement'; A.Sneddon
'Le roi demande, les états consente': Royal Council, Provincial Estates and Parliament in Eighteenth-century Burgundy; J.Swann
The Estates of Languedoc in Eighteenth-Century France: Administrative Expansion and Feudal Revitalisation; S.J.Miller
Managing a Composite Monarchy: the Hungarian Diet and the Habsburgs in the Eighteenth Century; O.Szakály
Lawmaking in a Post-Composite State? The Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth in the Eighteenth Century; R.Butterwick
Conclusion; D.W.Hayton& J.Kelly


Authors

D.W.HAYTON  is Professor of Early Modern Irish and British History at Queen's University Belfast, UK. He is the author of Ruling Ireland 1685-1742 (Boydell, 2004), and many articles and essays on politics, religion and society in Ireland and Britain in the late Seventeenth and early Eighteenth centuries.

JAMES KELLY  is Cregan Professor of History, and Head of the History Department at St Patrick's College, Dublin City University, Ireland. His publications include Poynings' Law and the making of law in Ireland, 1660-1800 (2007), and The Proceedings of the House of Lords, 1771-1800 (3 vols, 2008) and Sir Richard Musgrave, 1746-1818: Ultra-Protestant Ideologue (2009).

JOHN BERGIN  is a Research Fellow at Queen's University Belfast, UK. His research interests include the Irish Catholic and Quaker political lobbies in the eighteenth century, and Irish private divorce acts.