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The Complex Mind
 
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The Complex Mind
An Interdisciplinary Approach
 
 
Palgrave Macmillan
 
 
 
 
 
17 May 2012
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£63.00
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9780230247574
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The dominant approach of the last century to behaviour was `associationism' - reducing the complexity of behaviour to the homogeneous strengthening and weakening of simple connections between stimuli and responses. Chomsky's devastating critique of this account of human language in the 1960s, resulted in a cease fire with human's allowed `cognitive minds' with more expressive machinery, and animals consigned to the graveyard of associations. As messy as all ceasefires, this one left some animal researchers thinking associationism as bad a theory for animals as for people. But the good effect was that there was a broad appreciation that no one discipline would understand the complexities of the mind, and their origins. This book brings comparative and developmental psychology, robotics, linguistics and philosophy to bear on the problem of understanding the biological continuities and discontinuities of the human mind.


Description

The dominant approach of the last century to behaviour was `associationism' - reducing the complexity of behaviour to the homogeneous strengthening and weakening of simple connections between stimuli and responses. Chomsky's devastating critique of this account of human language in the 1960s, resulted in a cease fire with human's allowed `cognitive minds' with more expressive machinery, and animals consigned to the graveyard of associations. As messy as all ceasefires, this one left some animal researchers thinking associationism as bad a theory for animals as for people. But the good effect was that there was a broad appreciation that no one discipline would understand the complexities of the mind, and their origins. This book brings comparative and developmental psychology, robotics, linguistics and philosophy to bear on the problem of understanding the biological continuities and discontinuities of the human mind.


Reviews

Recommended by Choice


Contents

Preface
Acknowledgements
Notes on Contributors
PART I: COMPLEXITY IN ANIMAL MINDS
Introduction: M.McGonigle-Chalmers
Relational and Absolute Discrimination Learning by Squirrel Monkeys: Establishing a Common Ground with Human Cognition; B.T.Jones
Serial List Retention by Non-Human Primates: Complexity and Cognitive Continuity; F.R.Treichler
The Use of Spatial Structure in Working Memory: A Comparative Standpoint; C.De Lillo
The Emergence of Linear Sequencing in Children: A Continuity Account and a Formal Model; M.McGonigle-Chalmers & I.Kusel
Sensitivity to Quantity: What Counts Across Species?; S.T.Boysen & A.M.Yocom
PART II: COMPLEXITY IN ROBOTS
Editorial Introduction; D.McFarland
Towards Cognitive Robotics: Robotics, Biology and Developmental Psychology; M.Lee, U.Nehmzow & M.Rodriguez
Structuring Intelligence: The Role of Hierarchy, Modularity and Learning in Generating Intelligent Behaviour; J.J.Bryson
Epistemology, Access, and Computational Models; G.Luger
Reasoning About Representations in Autonomous Systems: What P´Olya and Lakatos Have To Say; A.Bundy
PART III: LANGUAGE, EVOLUTION AND THE COMPLEX MIND
Editorial Introduction; K.Stenning
How to Qualify for a Cognitive Upgrade: Executive Control, Glass Ceilings, and the Limits of Simian Success; A.Clark
Private Codes and Public Structures; C.Allen
The Emergence of Complex Language; W.Hinzen
Language Evolution: Enlarging the Picture; K.Stenning & M.Van Lambalgen
Epilogue: Reminiscences of Brendan McGonigle
Index


Authors

DAVID MCFARLAND Emeritus Fellow at Balliol College, University of Oxford, UK. He is author and editor of many books on behaviour; his most recent publications include Artificial Ethology, Oxford Dictionary of Animal Behaviour and Guilty Robots, Happy Dogs: The Question of Alien Minds.

KEITH STENNING Professor of Human Communication at the University of Edinburgh, UK. His research interests include: comparison of modalities of representation, learning/teaching of formal knowledge.

MARGARET MCGONIGLE Senior Lecturer in the Department of Psychology at the University of Edinburgh, UK. Her research interests include developmental cognition, executive functioning in childhood autism and Fragile X syndrome andcognitive neuroscience.