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The New European Left
 
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The New European Left
A Socialism for the Twenty-First Century?
 
 
Palgrave Macmillan
 
 
 
 
 
19 Jun 2012
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£60.00
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9780230248762
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DescriptionContentsAuthors

Marking two decades since the fall of the Berlin wall, The New European Left assesses the performance of the political current which has grown out of communist and other left forces. Despite expectations of the total demise of the communist movement after 1989, it shows how this has evolved into viable new political forces and parties, able to occupy the political space to the left of social democracy. Their coherent opposition to the Maastricht Treaty and defence of the welfare state ensured credible parliamentary support in key countries, even entering national and regional government. Internal reform and theoretical development led to a new type of left politics – green, feminist, anti-racist and anti-war. Later in the 1990s their identity evolved as part of the developing anti-capitalist, anti-globalization movement. Into the twenty-first century they played a major role in the anti-war campaigns of the post-9/11 world and spearheaded many of the campaigns against the increasing militarization of Europe. In the current global economic crisis their alternative social and economic vision has renewed potential to attract popular support. The New European Left analyses and assesses parties in both Western and Eastern Europe, their differences as well as similarities, and evaluates their role as a cohesive European political force and their role as an actor in the global context.




Description

Marking two decades since the fall of the Berlin wall, The New European Left assesses the performance of the political current which has grown out of communist and other left forces. Despite expectations of the total demise of the communist movement after 1989, it shows how this has evolved into viable new political forces and parties, able to occupy the political space to the left of social democracy. Their coherent opposition to the Maastricht Treaty and defence of the welfare state ensured credible parliamentary support in key countries, even entering national and regional government. Internal reform and theoretical development led to a new type of left politics – green, feminist, anti-racist and anti-war. Later in the 1990s their identity evolved as part of the developing anti-capitalist, anti-globalization movement. Into the twenty-first century they played a major role in the anti-war campaigns of the post-9/11 world and spearheaded many of the campaigns against the increasing militarization of Europe. In the current global economic crisis their alternative social and economic vision has renewed potential to attract popular support. The New European Left analyses and assesses parties in both Western and Eastern Europe, their differences as well as similarities, and evaluates their role as a cohesive European political force and their role as an actor in the global context.




Contents

Survival and Renewal: the 1990s
Regroupment: Establishing a European Movement
The Party of the European Left
Diverse Trends: an Overview
A Successful Model? Die Linke (the Left Party – Germany)
How Have the Mighty Fallen: Partita della Rifondazione Comunista (Party of Communist Refoundation – Italy)
Back from the Brink: French Communism Re-orientates (Parti Communiste Francais)
Communism Renewed and Supported: the Communist Party of Bohemia and Moravia (Czech Republic)
The Scandinavian Left
European Left and Global Left: 1999-2009


Authors

KATE HUDSON Visiting Fellow at London South Bank University, UK, having been Head of Social and Policy Studies from 2000 to 2010. She was Founding Editor of the international journal, Contemporary Politics, Editor from 1995 to 2008 and continues to serve on the editorial board, as well as that of Debatte: Journal of Contemporary Central and Eastern Europe. She is the author of European Communism Since 1989 (2000), The Rise and Fall of Yugoslavia (2003) and CND: Now More Than Ever – the Story of a Peace Movement (2005). She is also General Secretary of the Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament.