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18 Oct 2011
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£71.00
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9780230251847
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DescriptionContentsAuthors

This volume evaluates the extent to which post-conflict reconstruction has addressed problems of horizontal inequalities by looking at the experiences of seven diverse post-conflict countries: Burundi, Rwanda, Nepal, Peru, Guatemala, Bosnia and Herzegovina, and Afghanistan. It includes four cross-cutting thematic studies on macro-economic policies, privatisation, PRSP's, and employment generation. Revealing important gaps in the redressal of what are often deeply entrenched forms of group-based discrimination, deprivation and marginalisation, it points to distinct implications for policy and further research. The authors find that even in cases where HI's have been reduced, this has happened in a somewhat haphazard and inconsistent manner, with patchy implementation, gaps in coverage, and doubts as to the sustainability of this improvement. In addition, there is a clear pattern of evidence which suggests that improvements in some metrics of HI's are being offset and rendered ineffective by new forms of group inequalities, particularly those linked to neo-liberal reforms and global economic integration.


Description

This volume evaluates the extent to which post-conflict reconstruction has addressed problems of horizontal inequalities by looking at the experiences of seven diverse post-conflict countries: Burundi, Rwanda, Nepal, Peru, Guatemala, Bosnia and Herzegovina, and Afghanistan. It includes four cross-cutting thematic studies on macro-economic policies, privatisation, PRSP's, and employment generation. Revealing important gaps in the redressal of what are often deeply entrenched forms of group-based discrimination, deprivation and marginalisation, it points to distinct implications for policy and further research. The authors find that even in cases where HI's have been reduced, this has happened in a somewhat haphazard and inconsistent manner, with patchy implementation, gaps in coverage, and doubts as to the sustainability of this improvement. In addition, there is a clear pattern of evidence which suggests that improvements in some metrics of HI's are being offset and rendered ineffective by new forms of group inequalities, particularly those linked to neo-liberal reforms and global economic integration.


Contents

Horizontal Inequalities and Post-Conflict Development: Laying the Foundations for Durable Peace; A.Langer, F.Stewart & R.Venugopal
Macroeconomic Policies in Post-Conflict Countries; A.Langer & F.Stewart
Employment Policies and Horizontal Inequalities in Post-Conflict Situations; F.Stewart
Correcting Horizontal Inequality as a Development Priority: Poverty Reduction Strategy Papers (PRSPs) in Haiti, Liberia and Nepal; S.Fukuda-Parr
Privatization, Private Sector Development and Horizontal Inequalities in Post-Conflict Countries; R.Venugopal
The Bosnian Paradox: On the Causes of Post-War Inequality and Barriers to its Recognition and Reduction; S.L.Woodward
Explaining a Contradictory Record: The Case of Guatemala; C.Caumartin & D.Sanchez-Ancochea
Post-Conflict Economic Policy and Group Inequalities in Peru; J.C.Orihuela
Inequality and Post-Conflict Fiscal Policies in Burundi; J.D.Nkurunziza
Structural Violence and Conflict: Vertical and Horizontal Inequality in Post-Genocide Rwanda; S.Silva Leander
A Dangerous Peace? Drugs, Post-Conflict State Building and Horizontal Inequalities in Afghanistan; J.Goodhand, C.Dennys & D.Mansfield
Nepal: First Steps towards Redressing His?; G.K.Brown


Authors

Arnim Langer is Lecturer in International Relations and Director of the Centre for Research on Peace and Development (CRPD) at the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Frances Stewart is Emeritus Professor of Development Economics and Director of the Centre for Research on Inequality, Human Security and Ethnicity (CRISE) at the University of Oxford, UK.

Rajesh Venugopal is Lecturer in Development Studies at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE), UK.