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Innovation Policy and the Limits of Laissez-faire
 
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Innovation Policy and the Limits of Laissez-faire
Hong Kong's Policy in Comparative Perspective
Edited by Douglas B Fuller
 
 
Palgrave Macmillan
 
 
 
 
 
 
06 Oct 2010
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£76.00
|Hardback Print on Demand
  
9780230273368
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DescriptionContentsAuthors

In the wake of China's economic reforms in 1978, Hong Kong's industrial economy migrated northward, and it could have set
about developing a knowledge-intensive economy. But while Hong Kong's early industrialization was a runaway success, its transformation into a new kind of economy has been beset by problems. In this book, leading experts lay the blame on Hong Kong's laissez-faire tradition.

Hong Kong's innovation performance is assessed from regional and global perspectives while examining specific industries and economy-wide institutions for innovation. The lesson drawn is that in countries lacking both large businesses equipped with developed innovation capabilities and institutions for fostering the creation, diffusion, and commercialization of knowledge, laissez-faire just doesn't work. It is this policy of 'positive non-intervention' that has crippled Hong Kong's knowledge economy and prevented it from becoming the global center of innovation that it had the potential to become. The authors, nevertheless, point to sectors of Hong Kong's economy that offer potential promise, and they seek to show how a nimbler government hand could help the knowledge economy thrive.

This book will appeal to all who are interested in the dynamic East Asian economic region. But more than that, it provides a
case study of the respective merits of big versus small government, a topic as heated now as it has ever been.


Description

In the wake of China's economic reforms in 1978, Hong Kong's industrial economy migrated northward, and it could have set
about developing a knowledge-intensive economy. But while Hong Kong's early industrialization was a runaway success, its transformation into a new kind of economy has been beset by problems. In this book, leading experts lay the blame on Hong Kong's laissez-faire tradition.

Hong Kong's innovation performance is assessed from regional and global perspectives while examining specific industries and economy-wide institutions for innovation. The lesson drawn is that in countries lacking both large businesses equipped with developed innovation capabilities and institutions for fostering the creation, diffusion, and commercialization of knowledge, laissez-faire just doesn't work. It is this policy of 'positive non-intervention' that has crippled Hong Kong's knowledge economy and prevented it from becoming the global center of innovation that it had the potential to become. The authors, nevertheless, point to sectors of Hong Kong's economy that offer potential promise, and they seek to show how a nimbler government hand could help the knowledge economy thrive.

This book will appeal to all who are interested in the dynamic East Asian economic region. But more than that, it provides a
case study of the respective merits of big versus small government, a topic as heated now as it has ever been.


Contents

University-industry Collaboration and Technology Transfer in Hong Kong and Knowledge-based Economic Growth; D.C.Mowery
Enhancing HKSAR's Innovation System: Is there a Role for Public Policy? P.Kam Wong
Human Resources: Hong Kong's Challenges and Opportunities; D.M.Hart & F.Tian
Workforce Development in Hong Kong; V.Wadhwa
On Reform of Hong Kong's Public Research Funding System; Chintay Shih and Shin-Horng Chen
Hong Kong's Venture Capital System and the Commercialization of New Technology; K.Au & S.White
Hong Kong and the Pearl River Delta: Science and Technology Cooperation; A.Segal
Manufacturing for a Post-Manufacturing City; E.Thun
Biotechnology in Hong Kong: Prospects and Challenges; J.Wong
Government Neglect and the Decline of Hong Kong's Integrated Circuit Design Industry; D.B.Fuller
Hong Kong's New Creative Industries: The Example of the Video Games Sector; F.T.Tschang
Environmental Technology: Hong Kong's Innovation System; A.Sunami


Authors

DOUGLAS B FULLER is Lecturer of International Business and Comparative Management, Kings College London, UK. His research centres on the technology development strategies of firms in emerging economies with a regional focus on developing Asia. He did degrees in history (BA) at Swarthmore College and East Asian Studies (MA) at UC Berkeley before completing a PhD in Political Science at Massachusetts Institute of Technology. After taking his degree, he served as post-Doctoral Fellow at Stanford University's Stanford Project on Regions of Innovation and Entrepreneurship. Subsequently, he taught at the School of International Service in Washington DC and in the Department of Management of Chinese University of Hong Kong. He arrived at Kings in January 2008.