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Sex, Gender and the Conservative Party
 
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Sex, Gender and the Conservative Party
From Iron Lady to Kitten Heels
 
 
Palgrave Macmillan
 
 
 
 
 
15 Nov 2011
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£66.00
|Hardback In Stock
  
9780230279001
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DescriptionReviewsContentsAuthors

Sex, Gender and the Conservative Party provides a comprehensive gendered analysis of the contemporary UK Conservative Party. The modernization of the Conservative Party under David Cameron's leadership has garnered much comment. However, scholars have rarely considered the role of feminization in this. As leader of the party, Cameron inherited a multi-faceted gender problem: only 17 women MPs; an unhappy women's organization; electorally uncompetitive policies 'for women'; and a party which was seemingly unattractive to women voters. Written by leading gender politics and party scholars this book draws on extensive new empirical research to fill this gap. It examines how the party sought to increase the number of Conservative women MPs and looks at the nature and role of the women's organizations. It also analyzes how the party 'acted for women' in the 2005 Parliament, the nature of its electoral offer to women in 2010 and how party members and voters were likely to respond to the party's feminization efforts.


Description

Sex, Gender and the Conservative Party provides a comprehensive gendered analysis of the contemporary UK Conservative Party. The modernization of the Conservative Party under David Cameron's leadership has garnered much comment. However, scholars have rarely considered the role of feminization in this. As leader of the party, Cameron inherited a multi-faceted gender problem: only 17 women MPs; an unhappy women's organization; electorally uncompetitive policies 'for women'; and a party which was seemingly unattractive to women voters. Written by leading gender politics and party scholars this book draws on extensive new empirical research to fill this gap. It examines how the party sought to increase the number of Conservative women MPs and looks at the nature and role of the women's organizations. It also analyzes how the party 'acted for women' in the 2005 Parliament, the nature of its electoral offer to women in 2010 and how party members and voters were likely to respond to the party's feminization efforts.


Reviews

"Their analysis of the descriptive and substantive representation of women within the Conservative Party is comprehensive, detailed and clearly argued. By situating their analysis within the context of overall party strategy they make a significant and distinctive contribution to the emerging literature on Cameron and the Conservatives." - Timothy Heppell, The Journal of Legislative Studies, 18:3-4, 534-535


Contents

Introduction 
PART I: WOMEN'S POLITICAL REPRESENTATION
Conservatism, Representation and Feminization
PART II: WOMEN'S DESCRIPTIVE REPRESENTATION 
Women Members and the Party's Women's Organizations
Conservative Legislative Recruitment
Reforming Parliamentary Selection: Party Change, Parliamentarian and Party Member Attitudes
PART III: WOMEN'S SUBSTANTIVE REPRESENTATION 
Party Member Attitudes and Women's Policy (By and For Women?)
Sex, Gender and Parliamentary Behaviour in the 2005 Parliament
PART IV: FEMINIZATION AND PARTY STRATEGY
Feminization and Party Cohesion
Feminization and the Electorate
Conclusion
Methods Appendix
References
Index


Authors

SARAH CHILDS is Professor of Politics and Gender at the School of Sociology, Politics and International Studies, University of Bristol, UK. She has published widely on sex, gender and political representation. Her books include New Labour's Women MPs (2004), Women and British Party Politics (2008) and with Mona Lena Krook, Women, Gender and Politics: A Reader (2010).

PAUL WEBB is Professor of Politics at the Department of Politics and Contemporary European Studies, University of Sussex, UK and has held a number of previous and visiting positions in Britain and abroad, most recently at the Australian National University. He is author or editor of numerous publications, including The Modern British Party System (2000), Political Parties in Advanced Industrial Societies (2002) and The Presidentialization of Politics: A Comparative Study of Modern Democracies (2005). He is currently co-editor of the journal Party Politics.