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03 Nov 2010
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£64.00
|Hardback Print on Demand
  
9780230278516
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DescriptionReviewsContentsAuthors


Western democratic states are experiencing a backlash against the politics of multiculturalism. While a multicultural critique of liberal democracy is necessary it has all too often been rooted in the notion of cultures as separate and distinct, fuelling the backlash that regards this as a politics of division. The challenge facing liberals and multiculturalists alike is to recognise the importance of claims of culture without collapsing multicultural society into a series of discrete cultural ghettos. This book addresses the challenge by reframing the debate, moving away from the emphasis on cultural membership to focus instead on the contexts in which the particularities of minorities impact on claims for justice and recognition. We must respond to circumstances of injustice which impede minorities' capability to pursue meaningful activities in multiple dimensions – economic, social and political as well as cultural – as citizens of equal status. This book argues that it is possible to defend intercultural justice and freedom without entrenching culture, group and identity, and that it is important to do so.


Description


Western democratic states are experiencing a backlash against the politics of multiculturalism. While a multicultural critique of liberal democracy is necessary it has all too often been rooted in the notion of cultures as separate and distinct, fuelling the backlash that regards this as a politics of division. The challenge facing liberals and multiculturalists alike is to recognise the importance of claims of culture without collapsing multicultural society into a series of discrete cultural ghettos. This book addresses the challenge by reframing the debate, moving away from the emphasis on cultural membership to focus instead on the contexts in which the particularities of minorities impact on claims for justice and recognition. We must respond to circumstances of injustice which impede minorities' capability to pursue meaningful activities in multiple dimensions – economic, social and political as well as cultural – as citizens of equal status. This book argues that it is possible to defend intercultural justice and freedom without entrenching culture, group and identity, and that it is important to do so.


Reviews

'Switzerland, as many other countries, has to face questions raised by a multicultural society. Your book will doubtlessly play a part in the discussions that have to take place in order to address this issue.' - Micheline Calmy-Rey, President of the Swiss Confederation

'This powerful defence of a theory of intercultural justice is to be warmly welcomed. It offers a provocative and original perspective on the difficult problems of multicultural justice that confront us today.' - Simon Thompson, Reader in Political Theory, University of the West of England, UK

'This is an insightful, important contribution to the growing literature on the compatibility between republicanism and cultural pluralism. Drawing on Pettit's conception of non-domination and on non-essentialist, social interactionist theories of cultures and identities, Ganesh Nathan considerably renews our understanding of the demands of justice, freedom and recognition in pluralistic societies.' - Professor Cécile Laborde, Department of Political Science, University College London, UK

'I found it both interesting and politically timely.' - Dr. Anthony Corones, School of History and Philosophy, University of New South Wales, Australia

'This book is very useful in mapping the current debates in multicultural politics.' - Ethnic and Racial Studies
 
'One of the most admirable features of this book is the nuanced analysis of the dynamics of social interaction, and Nathan is consistently sensitive to the complex circumstances of multicultural domination and misrecognition.' - Political Studies Review






Contents

Introduction
PART I
A Critique of Liberal Multiculturalism.
A Model of Culture within the Paradigm of Anti-essentialism
PART II
The Normative Context of Well-being
Limitations to Social Participation
Social Freedom and Justice
Social Recognition and Non-domination
Morality and Responsibility
PART III
Liberalism and Communitarianism
Modern Civic Republicanism
Conclusion
References


Authors

GANESH NATHAN lectures in Business and Politics at the University of Applied Sciences, Northwestern Switzerland and private business schools in Lausanne and Zurich. His current research interests include responsible governance and leadership.