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Working for the State
 
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Working for the State
Employment Relations in the Public Services
Edited by Susan Corby and Graham Symon
 
 
Palgrave Macmillan
 
 
 
 
 
03 Oct 2011
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£71.00
|Hardback In Stock
  
9780230278639
||
 
 
eBooks ebook on Palgrave Connect  ebook available via library subscriptions ebook on ebooks.com 
 
 


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DescriptionContentsAuthors

The last three decades have witnessed the almost continual reform and re-organisation of the UK's public sector and public services, with yet more reforms underway. The impact of these reforms on the experiences of the public sector's six million workers and those employed in the private sector but providing public services are examined in this book.

To that end, some of the UK's leading scholars in public sector employment relations critically appraise aspects of public sector employment practices and examine the key dynamics, policy developments, institutions and actors from a range of perspectives in three thematic sections. In so doing, some contributors bring long-standing topics up-to-date, such as worker representation and reward, while others introduce new topics, such as management consultants and assistants to professionals, but all provide challenging insights into the services on which so many rely and the effects on those working for the state.


Description

The last three decades have witnessed the almost continual reform and re-organisation of the UK's public sector and public services, with yet more reforms underway. The impact of these reforms on the experiences of the public sector's six million workers and those employed in the private sector but providing public services are examined in this book.

To that end, some of the UK's leading scholars in public sector employment relations critically appraise aspects of public sector employment practices and examine the key dynamics, policy developments, institutions and actors from a range of perspectives in three thematic sections. In so doing, some contributors bring long-standing topics up-to-date, such as worker representation and reward, while others introduce new topics, such as management consultants and assistants to professionals, but all provide challenging insights into the services on which so many rely and the effects on those working for the state.


Contents

PART I: INTRODUCTION
From New Labour to a New Era? S.Corby & G.Symon
PART II: THE CONTEXT
Public Sector Reform and Employment Relations in Europe; M.Gold & U.Veersma
The Economic and Financial Context: Paying for the Banks; J.Shaoul
Public Sector 'Ethos'; J.Lethbridge
PART III: ISSUES
Rewarding Public Servants: Continuity and Change; G.White
Equality in the Public Sector: The Sky Darkens; S.Corby
PART IV: THE ACTORS
Assistant Roles in a Modernised Public Service: Towards a New Professionalism? S.Bach
The Third Sector's Provision of Public Services: Implications for Mission and Employment Conditions; I.Cunningham
Leaders in Public Service Organisations; P.McGurk
Organised Labour and State Employment; G.Symon
Consultants in Government: A Necessary Evil? P.Graham
PART V: CONCLUSION
Conclusion: Making Sense of Public Sector Employment Relations in a Time of Crisis; G.Symon & S.Corby


Authors

SUSAN CORBY is Professor of Employment Relations at the University of Greenwich Business School, UK, and has published widely on public sector employment relations and equality. She is currently leading a research project into employment tribunals funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

GRAHAM SYMON is Senior Lecturer in Human Resources and Organisational Behaviour at the University of Greenwich, UK, where he specialises in employment relations. In recent years he has published research on local governance, trade unions and lifelong learning policy.