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The Culture of the Publisher
 
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The Culture of the Publisher's Series, Volume 1
Authors, Publishers and the Shaping of Taste
Edited by John Spiers
 
 
Palgrave Macmillan
 
 
 
 
 
18 Feb 2011
|
£56.00
|Hardback In Stock
  
9780230284029
||
 
 
18 Feb 2011
|
£99.00
| In Stock
  
9780230284043
 
 
eBooks ebook on Palgrave Connect  ebook available via library subscriptions ebook on ebooks.com 
 
 


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DescriptionReviewsContentsAuthors

This innovative volume is part of a two-volume set concerned with the culture of the publishers' series world-wide and over several centuries. It offers eleven entirely new studies, with much new material on series from many nations and contexts, and does much to illuminate the various conditions and events, beliefs and ideas that lay behind book trade developments on several continents, and how they were implicated both in the evolution of the book trade and of the wider society. The editor, Professor John Spiers, examines the implications of series in their wider economic, political and social context. He emphasises the cultural work done by the series, and the importance of approaching publishing as a creative, risk-taking business. Necessarily, some axioms of best historical practise open out in the process, embracing both the arts and the sciences.

The phenomenon of the publisher's series - and the fundamental cultural work done by 'the series' - has previously been neglected by all but a few scholars working on individual publishing houses. The series has never before been considered holistically as part of the changes in culture and the production, pricing and distribution of books since the 18th century, and as something with precedents in earlier periods and ramifications in later ones. This is a ground-breaking volume which places the publishers' series in a deservedly key position, and it is concerned with such issues as market forces, canonicity, copyright, literary education, popular and pulp fiction, high art, and marketing in its many aspects. Volume 1 includes studies by scholars from Britain, the USA, Canada, Australia, France, Germany, and Belgium. Using a wide range of approaches, the different contributors' voices emerge as complimentary metholodological systems. They discuss specific series in detail, and also the work of the many agents engaged in print culture including entrepreneurial publishers, authors, literary agents, designers, wholesale and retail distributors, and the popular media.





 


Description

This innovative volume is part of a two-volume set concerned with the culture of the publishers' series world-wide and over several centuries. It offers eleven entirely new studies, with much new material on series from many nations and contexts, and does much to illuminate the various conditions and events, beliefs and ideas that lay behind book trade developments on several continents, and how they were implicated both in the evolution of the book trade and of the wider society. The editor, Professor John Spiers, examines the implications of series in their wider economic, political and social context. He emphasises the cultural work done by the series, and the importance of approaching publishing as a creative, risk-taking business. Necessarily, some axioms of best historical practise open out in the process, embracing both the arts and the sciences.

The phenomenon of the publisher's series - and the fundamental cultural work done by 'the series' - has previously been neglected by all but a few scholars working on individual publishing houses. The series has never before been considered holistically as part of the changes in culture and the production, pricing and distribution of books since the 18th century, and as something with precedents in earlier periods and ramifications in later ones. This is a ground-breaking volume which places the publishers' series in a deservedly key position, and it is concerned with such issues as market forces, canonicity, copyright, literary education, popular and pulp fiction, high art, and marketing in its many aspects. Volume 1 includes studies by scholars from Britain, the USA, Canada, Australia, France, Germany, and Belgium. Using a wide range of approaches, the different contributors' voices emerge as complimentary metholodological systems. They discuss specific series in detail, and also the work of the many agents engaged in print culture including entrepreneurial publishers, authors, literary agents, designers, wholesale and retail distributors, and the popular media.





 


Reviews

'An invaluable and engrossing re-evaluation of the Publishers Series, providing stimulating international comparisons and a lasting and important contribution to modern social and cultural history' - James Raven, Professor in Modern History, University of Essex, UK
 
'The phenomenon of the publisher's series - so central to 18th and 19th-century publishing and reading practices - has never before been considered so fully. In the sheer breadth of the new material they encompass, enabling comparisons across time and space, these volumes will prove invaluable to students and scholars alike.' - Mary Hammond, Senior Lecturer, Department of English, University of Southampton, UK


Contents

List of Illustrations
Acknowledgements
Notes on Contributors
Introduction: Wondering about 'the Causes of Causes'. The Publisher's Series, its Cultural Work and Meanings
PART I: The Methodologies of Series and the Limits of Knowledge; J.Spiers
Market Forces and Modernization in the French Book Trade in the Last Century of the 'Ancien Regime' and in the early 20th Century: Some Reflections on the Emergence of the Publisher's Series; W.Kirsop
The Invention of the Book Series in France, 1850-1950; I.Olivero
Canonicity, Reprint Publishing, and Copyright; G.B.Neavill
'To undertake such works as they find to be wanted': The Early Years of the Clarendon Press Series; S.Eliot
Personality, Appreciation and Literary Education: Harrap's 'Poetry and Life' Series, 1911-1930; P.Buckridge
Excavating original African-American 'pulp fiction': W. W. Norton's 'Old School Books' Series; C.Cottenet
Thomas Nelson's and John Buchan: Mutual Marketing in the Publisher's Series; K.Macdonald
The Series as Commodity: Marketing T. Fisher Unwin's 'Pseudonym' and 'Autonym' Libraries; F.Nesta
Sifting out 'Rubbish' in the Literature of the 1920s: Chatto and Windus and the 'Phoenix Library'; A.Nash
A Modern Library for Modern Times. Behind the Scenes at the Albatross Press; M.K.Troy
Sound Information and Innocent Amusement: John Murray's Books on the Move; B.Schaff
Index


Authors

JOHN SPIERS is Senior Research Fellow at the Institute of English Studies, UK, and a Visiting Professor at the University of Glamorgan, UK. He is also a distinguished publisher, founding the Harvester Press in 1969.