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23 Oct 2012
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£53.00
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9780230293717
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DescriptionReviewsContentsAuthors

The book focuses on Martin Crimp's plays, translations, adaptations and versions from 1985 to the present. It contends that Crimp's is a theatre of radical defamiliarization and proposes that to understand how this materializes both textually and in performance we need to refresh our understanding of the term. The book therefore draws upon phenomenology to locate the intensity and efficacy of Crimp's writing.

Each chapter focuses on case studies contextualized in relation to other texts linked by their content so as to weave the inner narrative of Crimp's theatre. Through an examination of the rich, ambiguous content and formal experimentation of Crimp's work, the book proposes that defamiliarization in his plays serves to engage audiences in ideas relating to the commercialization of daily life, the artist's consumption by the entertainment industry, the inherent violence in domestic environments, the restrictiveness of social class, and the understanding of a nation's own identity through its encounter with the Other.


Description

The book focuses on Martin Crimp's plays, translations, adaptations and versions from 1985 to the present. It contends that Crimp's is a theatre of radical defamiliarization and proposes that to understand how this materializes both textually and in performance we need to refresh our understanding of the term. The book therefore draws upon phenomenology to locate the intensity and efficacy of Crimp's writing.

Each chapter focuses on case studies contextualized in relation to other texts linked by their content so as to weave the inner narrative of Crimp's theatre. Through an examination of the rich, ambiguous content and formal experimentation of Crimp's work, the book proposes that defamiliarization in his plays serves to engage audiences in ideas relating to the commercialization of daily life, the artist's consumption by the entertainment industry, the inherent violence in domestic environments, the restrictiveness of social class, and the understanding of a nation's own identity through its encounter with the Other.


Reviews

'Throughout, Angelaki's deep admiration for and sustained engagement with Crimp's work is evident. This has its most positive effects in her combination of textual and performance analysis: for this reason, her book makes an extremely useful contribution to which future scholars will no doubt be indebted.' - Rachel Clements, New Theatre Quarterly


Contents

Acknowledgements
Introduction: Reaching Beneath the Surface
Urban Materialism and the Self as Commodity
The Artist and the Industry of Mass Consumption
(Un)Spoken Violence and Domestic Power Relations
Urban Violence, Social Class, Political Transgressions
Translating There and Then into Here and Now
In Lieu of a Conclusion: Spectator as Character
Appendix: Details of Original Staging for Plays, Adaptations, Translations and Versions by Martin Crimp
Notes
Selected Critical Sources on Martin Crimp
Index


Authors

VICKY ANGELAKI is Lecturer in Drama at the Department of Drama and Theatre Arts, University of Birmingham, UK. She publishes on modern, recent and contemporary British and European theatre in relation to audience perception, spectatorship and citizenship, politics and aesthetics, as well as translation and adaptation within a broader cultural context.