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14 Nov 2012
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£68.00
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9780230302655
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DescriptionReviewsContentsAuthors

Drawing on studies from major European countries and Australia, this exciting new collection from a group of internationally-renowned scholars extends the ongoing debate on falling crime rates from the perspective of criminal opportunity or routine activity theory. Considering the trends and discourse of the international crime fall, this book analyses the effect of Post World War II crime booms which triggered a universal improvement in security across the Western world, such as the introduction of mandatory security in motor vehicles in Europe and the US. Preliminary evidence is also presented on the impact of collective improvements in home security, analyzing levels of household burglaries and their distribution amongst the population in The Netherlands, England and Wales.
The International Crime Drop discusses how improved security against volume crime has initiated a prolonged recession on criminal markets in the West, a downturn that appears largely independent from criminal policies of individual governments. With fresh evidence for the causes of international falls in crime, this book signals a new direction in epidemiological studies of crime.





Description

Drawing on studies from major European countries and Australia, this exciting new collection from a group of internationally-renowned scholars extends the ongoing debate on falling crime rates from the perspective of criminal opportunity or routine activity theory. Considering the trends and discourse of the international crime fall, this book analyses the effect of Post World War II crime booms which triggered a universal improvement in security across the Western world, such as the introduction of mandatory security in motor vehicles in Europe and the US. Preliminary evidence is also presented on the impact of collective improvements in home security, analyzing levels of household burglaries and their distribution amongst the population in The Netherlands, England and Wales.
The International Crime Drop discusses how improved security against volume crime has initiated a prolonged recession on criminal markets in the West, a downturn that appears largely independent from criminal policies of individual governments. With fresh evidence for the causes of international falls in crime, this book signals a new direction in epidemiological studies of crime.





Reviews

"The importance of [this book's] content and the quality of the information given on crime trends should not be overlooked. For students wishing to look into ideas for theses and theorists looking to make an impact on future crime prevention policy, this book is an invaluable and accessible stepping stone and point of reference to finding answers to an important phenomenon. The International Crime Drop is a much needed consolidation of useful crime statistics and analyses, with figures that are ripe for interpretation and development, and a great deal of scope to influence criminological thinking." - The Internet Journal of Criminology





Contents

Editors' Introduction
PART I: INTERNATIONAL TRENDS 
Global Overview: International trends in Victimization and Recorded Crime; J.van Dijk & A.Tseloni
Crime Trends in Western Europe According to Official Statistics from 1990 to 2007; M.F.Aebi & A.Linde
The Case of Australia and New Zealand; P.Mayhew
Trends in Violence Against Women: Some Good News and Some Bad News; K.Kangaspunta & I.H.Marshall
The Crime Drop in 'Non-Western' Countries: a Review of Homicide Data; A.A.del Frate & G.Mugellini
PART II: CRIME ANALYSIS AND PATTERNS
Underlying Patterns within the England and Wales Crime Drop; A.Britton, C.Kershaw, S.Osborne & K.Smith
Crime, Inequality and Change in England and Wales; L.Grove, A.Tseloni & N.Tilley
The Crime Drop in Comparative Perspective: The Impact of the Economy and Imprisonment on American and European Burglary Rates; R.Rosenfeld & S.F.Messner
PART III: NEW PERSPECTIVES
Security and the Drop in Car Theft in the United States; S.Fujita & M.Maxfield
Self-limiting Crime Waves; J.van Dijk & B.Vollaard
The Crime Drop Discourse – or the Illusion of Uniform Continental Trends: Switzerland as a Contrasting Case; M.Killias & B.Lanfranconi
Crime in the Broad Sweep of History; M.Felson
Towards a Comprehensive Research Plan on Opportunity Theory and the Crime Falls; A.Tseloni, G.Farrell, N.Tilley, L.Grove, R.Thompson & L.Garius
Editors' Conclusions: Understanding International Crime Trends: A Summing Up


Authors

JAN VAN DIJK is the founder of the International Crime Victims Survey and a former director of the crime programme of the United Nations in Vienna, Austria. He currently serves as the Pieter van Vollenhoven Professor in Victimology and Human Security at Tilburg University, the Netherlands. His latest books include the World of Crime, an overview of international statistics on crime and criminal justice (SAGE, 2008). He is the winner of the Stockholm Prize in Criminology 2012.

ANDROMACHI TSELONI is Professor of Criminology at Nottingham Trent University, UK, Visiting Professor at the University of Huddersfield, UK, and SCoPiC Senior Research Fellow at the Institute of Criminology, University of Cambridge. In addition to her collaborative research on the international crime falls she is renowned for her work on individual and contextual risk and protective factors of victimisation risk and frequency. She has taught Applied Social Statistics at Universities in Greece, the UK and the USA. Her work is mostly published in academic journals.

GRAHAM FARRELL is Senior Research Fellow at the Institute for Canadian Urban Research Studies at Simon Fraser University, Canada, and Professor of Criminology at Loughborough University, UK. He has worked at the Universities of Cincinnati, Rutgers, and Oxford, at the Police Foundation, and the United Nations, and published around 100 studies on repeat victimization, crime prevention, policing, and criminal justice. In 2007 he evaluated UNODC work developing the criminal justice system in Afghanistan.