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The Right Kind of History
 
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The Right Kind of History
Teaching the Past in Twentieth-Century England
 
 
Palgrave Macmillan
 
 
 
 
 
18 Nov 2011
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£63.00
|Hardback In Stock
  
9780230300866
||
 
 
18 Nov 2011
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£14.99
|Paperback In Stock
  
9780230300873
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DescriptionReviewsContentsAuthors

The firstground-breaking account of the teaching of history in England's state schools from the early 1900s to the present day, this accessible study is a major contribution to the current debates about the place of history in the classroom and the national curriculum. Drawing on a wide variety of hitherto unpublished material, including an especially created oral history archive and the recollections of many former pupils as to what it was like to be on the receiving end and how much they have remembered of what they were taught, the authors of this powerfully-argued book present an original and comprehensive account of the political decisions and the pedagogic practices which determined the sort of history that was taught in the classroom. Concluding with some important recommendations about what needs to be done to safeguard the teaching of history in England's schools in the future, The Right Kind of History will be an invaluable resource for teachers, scholars, educationalists andpolicy-makers.


Description

The firstground-breaking account of the teaching of history in England's state schools from the early 1900s to the present day, this accessible study is a major contribution to the current debates about the place of history in the classroom and the national curriculum. Drawing on a wide variety of hitherto unpublished material, including an especially created oral history archive and the recollections of many former pupils as to what it was like to be on the receiving end and how much they have remembered of what they were taught, the authors of this powerfully-argued book present an original and comprehensive account of the political decisions and the pedagogic practices which determined the sort of history that was taught in the classroom. Concluding with some important recommendations about what needs to be done to safeguard the teaching of history in England's schools in the future, The Right Kind of History will be an invaluable resource for teachers, scholars, educationalists andpolicy-makers.


Reviews

'Their book should be compulsory reading for anyone wanting to take part in the current discussion about history teaching and its future in our schools. At a single stroke, this book puts the whole debate onto a more sophisticated and grown-up level.'
 
- The Independent
 
'They make a strong, persuasive case and it's possible that history may one day be complusory to 16 as part of a Baccalaureate style curriculum.'
 
- BBC History Magazine, David Nicholls, Emeritus Professor of History, Manchester Metropolitan University


Contents

List of Illustrations
Acknowledgements
List of Abbreviations
A Note on Sources
Introduction: Themes and Problems
History Goes to School, 1900-18
History in Peace and War, 1918-44
History and the Welfare State, 1944-64
History for a Nation 'In Decline', 1964-79
History in the National Curriculum, 1979-2010
Conclusion: Perspectives and Suggestions
Appendixes:
A. Names of interviewees
B. Names of lenders and donors
C. School Certificate examination syllabuses in 1923
D. History syllabuses from the 1970s onwards
E. History examination results, 1919-2010
F. Principal education ministers, 1900-2010
G. A Note on the History in Education website
Notes
Index


Authors

SIR DAVID CANNADINE is currently Dodge Professor of History at Princeton University, having previously taught at Cambridge University and Columbia University, and been Director of the Institute of Historical Research and Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother Professor of History in the University of London. Among his many books are The Decline and Fall of the British Aristocracy, G.M.Trevelyan: A Life in History, Class in Britain, Ornamentalism: How the British Saw their Empire, Mellon: An American Life, and Making History Now and Then.

DR JENNY KEATING has degrees from the University of Sussex and Monash University. She has been a museum curator, teacher, advice worker and journalist and, while living in Australia, worked as a commissioned historian. After returning to the UK she completed a DPhil, published as A Child for Keeps: The History of Adoption in England, 1918-45, and is currently a Research Fellow for the History in Education Project at the Institute of Historical Research.

DR NICOLA SHELDON has degrees from Manchester and Oxford Universities. She worked for 16 years in secondary education, in both teaching and management roles, before completing her doctorate on the history of truancy. She has published articles in the journal History of Education and on contemporary educational issues via www.historyandpolicy.org. She now works for the Institute of Education in teacher training.