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30 Aug 2012
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Oil booms are often described as causing more problems than they solve, bringing wealth to the privileged few while visiting corrupt practices, social inequity and even civil war upon the general population. The recurrence of this scenario gave rise to the 'resource curse' theory, which asserts that these ills are the logical conclusion of resource booms. This volume counters that the true cause for the failure of oil and gas booms to promote socio-economic development is the conscious choice of political elites to pursue regime survival and personal enrichment. In-depth case studies illustrate how political elites in Azerbaijan, Kazakhstan and Turkmenistan have responded to the resource challenges related to ownership rights, foreign direct investment, corruption, oil revenue management and socio-economic development. In their contributions, leading academic experts provide ample evidence that these elites bear responsibility for shaping the largely negative outcomes of the Caspian resource booms.


Description

Oil booms are often described as causing more problems than they solve, bringing wealth to the privileged few while visiting corrupt practices, social inequity and even civil war upon the general population. The recurrence of this scenario gave rise to the 'resource curse' theory, which asserts that these ills are the logical conclusion of resource booms. This volume counters that the true cause for the failure of oil and gas booms to promote socio-economic development is the conscious choice of political elites to pursue regime survival and personal enrichment. In-depth case studies illustrate how political elites in Azerbaijan, Kazakhstan and Turkmenistan have responded to the resource challenges related to ownership rights, foreign direct investment, corruption, oil revenue management and socio-economic development. In their contributions, leading academic experts provide ample evidence that these elites bear responsibility for shaping the largely negative outcomes of the Caspian resource booms.


Contents

Introduction; A.Heinrich
PART I: THEORIES AND CONCEPTS
The Rentier State; T.Richter
The 'Slippery Slopes' Theory; I.Overland
Neopatrimonialism: Concept or Metaphor? G.Erdmann
Patron-Client Relations; A.Heinemann-Gruder
PART II: PATTERNS OF ELITE INTERACTION AND POLICY-MAKING IN THE ENERGY SECTOR
Political Elites in Kazakhstan; T.Umbetalieva & D.Satpaev
Kinship and the State in Kazakhstan's Political Economy; E.Schatz
The Role of the Oil Elite in Policy-Making in Kazakhstan; J.Kusznir
Political Elites in Azerbaijan; F.Guliyev
The Role of the Oil Elite in Policy-Making in Azerbaijan; H.Meissner
Politics and the Energy Sector in Turkmenistan; M.Denison
PART III: REGULATION OF PROPERTY RIGHTS AND INVESTMENT
Foreign Direct Investors and National Politics; B.Brauer
Regulating Property and Exploitation Rights of Natural Resources; C.Nygaard
National Oil Companies and the State; H.Kjaernet
The Role of Corruption in the Governance of the Oil and Gas Industry; H.Pleines
PART IV: SPENDING THE PETRO DOLLARS
The National Fund of the Republic of Kazakhstan; Y.Kalyuzhnova
Managing the State Oil Fund in Azerbaijan; K.Aslanli
Providing Welfare in post-Soviet Rentier States; A.Franke
Conclusion; A.Heinrich & H.Pleines


Authors

Andreas Heinrich is a researcher at the Research Centre for East European Studies, University of Bremen, Germany. His research focuses on energy relations in the former Soviet Union and Eastern Europe.

Heiko Pleines is head of the department of Politics and Economics at the Research Centre for East European Studies and lecturer in comparative politics at the University of Bremen, Germany. He has worked extensively on the influence of non-state actors on political decision-making processes.