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25 Jan 2012
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£13.99
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9780230314436
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DescriptionReviewsContentsAuthors

In Us before Me, a philosopher argues that persistent, unabated human suffering requires that the traditional tools of moral philosophy and everyday ethics be supplemented with a new moral principle that shifts the focus from individualism and self- interest to our collective interests. She proposes that social capital, widely recognized as good for individuals and the community, also has important ethical qualities. Treating social capital as a moral principle can override people's reluctance to create social capital because of a concern that others will free ride on their efforts.

Patricia Illingworth takes the position that promoting social capital will increase individual, community and global well-being. As people globalize their social networks, mindful of the moral obligation to act impartialy with respect to social ties, they also promote tolerance, global goodwill and the care and concern needed to alleviate global suffering. The ethics of social capital can override our tendancy to bond with similar other and lift the veil of darkness that overshadows social capital, the inclination towards kinship and tribalism.


Description

In Us before Me, a philosopher argues that persistent, unabated human suffering requires that the traditional tools of moral philosophy and everyday ethics be supplemented with a new moral principle that shifts the focus from individualism and self- interest to our collective interests. She proposes that social capital, widely recognized as good for individuals and the community, also has important ethical qualities. Treating social capital as a moral principle can override people's reluctance to create social capital because of a concern that others will free ride on their efforts.

Patricia Illingworth takes the position that promoting social capital will increase individual, community and global well-being. As people globalize their social networks, mindful of the moral obligation to act impartialy with respect to social ties, they also promote tolerance, global goodwill and the care and concern needed to alleviate global suffering. The ethics of social capital can override our tendancy to bond with similar other and lift the veil of darkness that overshadows social capital, the inclination towards kinship and tribalism.


Reviews

'Us Before Me is a timely and thoughtful book. I hope that Illingworth's case for the importance of social capital, and especially global social capital, will be widely read and highly influential.' - Peter Singer, Professor of Bioethics, Princeton University, USA

'All truly great leaders—in other words, those who care about people—will find the ideas in Us Before Me central to how they frame their local and global responsibilities. Illingworth has made an important link between thinking, feeling and acting that provides a leap forward for leaders to effect changes that help solve human problems in our organizations, communities, countries and world.' - Nancy Dearman, Chief Executive Officer, Kotter International




Contents

Foreword
Acknowledgements
Introduction
Making a Difference
The Heart of the Matter
The Ethics of Us
The Moral Sweet Spot
With a Little Help from the Law
Giving Back
Global People
Notes
References
Index


Authors

PATRICIA ILLINGWORTH is Associate Professor in the Department of Philosophy and in the College of Business Administration at Northeastern University, USA, where she is also a Lecturer in Law. Professor Illingworth has held fellowships at Harvard Law School and at Harvard Medical School. She is the author of AIDS and the Good Society and Trusting Medicine: The Moral Costs of Managed Care, and a co-editor of The Power of Pills and Ethical Healthcare. She is also co-editor with Thomas Pogge and Leif Wenar, of Giving Well: The Ethics of Philanthropy.