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Rethinking Chaucerian Beasts
 
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Rethinking Chaucerian Beasts
Edited by Carolynn Van Dyke
 
 
Palgrave Macmillan
 
 
 
 
 
25 Oct 2012
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£60.00
|Hardback Print on Demand
  
9780230338586
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eBooks ebook on Palgrave Connect  ebook available via library subscriptions ebook on ebooks.com 
 
 


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DescriptionReviewsContentsAuthors

Collectively undertaking the first sustained examination of Chaucer's representation of non-human creatures since Beryl Rowland's Blind Beasts, this book connects work in critical animal studies and close readings of Chaucer's texts. Grouped under five headings—the material creature, animal lessons, becoming-animal, contested boundaries, and cross-species discourse—the sixteen essays combine close reading of Chaucer's major texts with various analytical frameworks, from medieval natural science to critical animal studies. The resulting readings enlarge and re-center critical discourse not just about Chaucer's non-human animals but also about his representation of gender, genre, and the place of the human being in the universe of species.


Description

Collectively undertaking the first sustained examination of Chaucer's representation of non-human creatures since Beryl Rowland's Blind Beasts, this book connects work in critical animal studies and close readings of Chaucer's texts. Grouped under five headings—the material creature, animal lessons, becoming-animal, contested boundaries, and cross-species discourse—the sixteen essays combine close reading of Chaucer's major texts with various analytical frameworks, from medieval natural science to critical animal studies. The resulting readings enlarge and re-center critical discourse not just about Chaucer's non-human animals but also about his representation of gender, genre, and the place of the human being in the universe of species.


Reviews

"This book of sixteen short essays offers Chaucerians an array of perspectives, some theoretically adept, others easing readers gently into critical animal studies." - The Medieval Review 
 
"Dyke has assembled a timely collection, since critical animal studies have risen recently in status and visibility . . . this volume will likely be of some interest to researchers working on medieval attitudes toward the animal, and the brevity of the essays may make them suitable for the undergraduate classroom as well . . . Recommended." - Choice


Contents

Introduction: In Hir Corages: Chaucer and the Animal Real; C.Van Dyke
PART I: THE NATURAL CREATURE
Among All Beasts: Affective Naturalism in Late Medieval England; A.Fradenburg
Feathering the Text; C.Freeman
Shrews, Rats, and a Polecat in ―The Pardoner's Tale; S.Feinstein & N.Woodman
PART II: ANIMAL LESSONS
Chaucer's Chicks: Feminism and Falconry in ―The Knight's Tale, The Squire's Tale, and The Parliament of Fowls; S.Gutmann
Foiled by Fowl: The Squire's Peregrine Falcon and the Franklin's Dorigen; L.K.Stock
That Which Chargeth Not to Say: Animal Imagery in Troilus and Criseyde; C.Van Dyke
PART III: BECOMING-ANIMAL
Avian Hybridity in The Squire's Tale: Uses of Anthropomorphism; S.D.Schotland
Reimagining Natural Order in The Wife of Bath's Prologue; L.Wang
Contemplating Finitude: Animals in The Book of the Duchess; C.Roman
PART IV: CONTESTED BOUNDARIES
Animal Agency, the Law of Kynde and Chaucer's Message in The Book of the Duchess; R.R.Judkins
A beest may al his lust fulfille: Naturalizing Chivalric Violence in Chaucer's Knight's Tale; J.Withers
A Fourteenth-Century Ecology: The Former Age with Dindimus; K.Steel
PART V: CROSS-SPECIES DISCOURSE
Chaucer's Chauntecleer and Animal Morality; M.Palmer Browne
Talking Animals, Debating Beasts; W.A.Matlock
Species or Specious? Authorial Choices in The Parliament of Fowls; M.Ridley Elmes
Chaucer's Cuckoo and the Myth of Anthropomorphism; L.Kordecki
Afterword: Gender, Genre, Genus; C.Van Dyke


Authors

Carolynn Van Dyke is Francis A. March Professor of English at Lafayette College.