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Political Autonomy and Divided Societies
 
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Political Autonomy and Divided Societies
Imagining Democratic Alternatives in Complex Settings
 
 
Palgrave Macmillan
 
 
 
 
 
27 Mar 2012
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£66.00
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9780230364257
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DescriptionContentsAuthors

Autonomy has been widely advocated as a means of managing national diversity, whilst meeting the demands of justice and stability. It comes in a variety of forms, both territorial and non-territorial and spans the categories of secession, confederation, federalism, devolution, local government and cultural self-management. Using the term in a broad way, this book examines its meanings in political and legal theory and its application in a variety of settings in Europe, North America and Asia. Among the issues discussed are: normative theories of self-determination; the definition and boundaries of autonomous communities; secession and its alternatives; the political economy of autonomy; the policy capacity of autonomous governments; legal conceptions of autonomy and the international context.


Description

Autonomy has been widely advocated as a means of managing national diversity, whilst meeting the demands of justice and stability. It comes in a variety of forms, both territorial and non-territorial and spans the categories of secession, confederation, federalism, devolution, local government and cultural self-management. Using the term in a broad way, this book examines its meanings in political and legal theory and its application in a variety of settings in Europe, North America and Asia. Among the issues discussed are: normative theories of self-determination; the definition and boundaries of autonomous communities; secession and its alternatives; the political economy of autonomy; the policy capacity of autonomous governments; legal conceptions of autonomy and the international context.


Contents

Introduction; M.Keating & A-G.Gagnon
PART I: CONCEPTUAL APPROACHES
Rethinking Territorial Autonomy; M.Keating
Autonomy, Boundaries and Trust: Preliminary Remarks; G.Nootens
Reconciling Autonomy, Community and Empowerment: The Difficult Birth of a Diversity School in the Western World; A-G.Gagnon
Sub-State Governance through Territorial Autonomy: On the Relationship Between Autonomy and Federalism; M.Suksi
PART II: CASE STUDIES
Central, Eastern and South-Eastern Europe and Territorial Autonomy: Are They Really Incompatible?; F.Palermo
Seeking New Autonomies: State Rescaling, Reterritorialization and Minority Identities in Atlantic Canada; J.Bickerton
Recrafting Sovereignty: Lessons from Small Island Autonomies?; E.Hepburn
Insularity and Autonomy; A.Fazi
The 'Canadian School of Diversity' and Francophone Minority Communities; R.Léger
Autonomy and Ethnic Diversity: The Case of Xinjiang Uighur Autonomous Region in China; I.Côté
Regions and Territorial Autonomy in Southeastern Europe; D.Stjepanović
Autonomy and Nationalist Demands in Southeast Asia; J.Bertrand
Catalan Autonomy Building-Process in Immigration Policy: Conceptual, Institutional and Normative Dimensions; R.Zapata-Barrero
Conclusion; A-G.Gagnon & M.Keating


Authors

ALAIN-G. GAGNON Professor of Political Science at the Université du Québec à Montréal, Canada. He is the author of The Case for Multinational Federalism (2010), the editor of Contemporary Canadian Federalism (2008) and the co-editor of Multinational Democracies (with James Tully, 2001). In 2008, he was elected Member of the Royal Society of Canada.
MICHAEL KEATING Professor of Politics at the University of Aberdeen, UK. He has published widely on European Politics, Nationalism, Devolution and Scottish Politics and Government and has taught in universities in England, Scotland, Canada, the USA, Spain and France and at the European University Institute in Florence.