Palgrave Macmillan Home
Login or Register    Shopping Basket Shopping Basket
Search 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
13 Aug 2012
|
£58.00
|Hardback In Stock
  
9780230363984
||
 
 
eBooks  ebook available via library subscriptions ebook on ebooks.com google eBooks 
 
 


OrderHelpBox
                                                                                                                                              returns, payment and delivery


DescriptionContentsAuthors

Anne Schwenkenbecher examines the most urgent philosophical questions pertaining to the problem of terrorism: What is terrorism, or, how should it be defined? And could terrorism ever be justified? The book questions well established frameworks and widely held convictions: it denies that terrorism is always wrong and morally worse than war. It invites the reader to approach these matters from a new perspective, according to which terrorism is just one of many forms of political violence. It argues that if war can be justified then so can terrorism. Despite the large academic literature on terrorism, there are still urgent and thus far unanswered philosophical questions pertaining to the conceptualization and the moral evaluation of terrorism. Apart from relying on intrinsically flawed definitions of terrorism, many academics apply double standards when discussing this problem.

Anne Schwenkenbecher's motivation for the project is to provide a comprehensive debate of both the concept and the ethics of terrorism which seeks to avoid these shortcomings.


Description

Anne Schwenkenbecher examines the most urgent philosophical questions pertaining to the problem of terrorism: What is terrorism, or, how should it be defined? And could terrorism ever be justified? The book questions well established frameworks and widely held convictions: it denies that terrorism is always wrong and morally worse than war. It invites the reader to approach these matters from a new perspective, according to which terrorism is just one of many forms of political violence. It argues that if war can be justified then so can terrorism. Despite the large academic literature on terrorism, there are still urgent and thus far unanswered philosophical questions pertaining to the conceptualization and the moral evaluation of terrorism. Apart from relying on intrinsically flawed definitions of terrorism, many academics apply double standards when discussing this problem.

Anne Schwenkenbecher's motivation for the project is to provide a comprehensive debate of both the concept and the ethics of terrorism which seeks to avoid these shortcomings.


Contents

Acknowledgements
Introduction
PART I: DEFINING 'TERRORISM'
On The Current Debate On Defining Terrorism
What Is Terrorism?
PART II: ETHICS OF TERRORISM OR CAN TERRORISM EVER BE PERMISSIBLE?
Innocents and Non-Innocents
Terrorism Against Non-Innocents
Terrorism Against Innocents
Collateral Damage
Concluding Remarks
References
Index


Authors

ANNE SCHWENKENBECHER is a Lecturer in Philosophy at Murdoch University, School of Arts, Western Australia. She has previously held positions at the University of Melbourne and at the Centre for Applied Philosophy and Public Ethics at the Australian National University, Canberra. Her main research interests are in the ethics of war and terrorism, the morality of groups and the ethics of climate change.