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31 Jul 2012
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£12.99
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9781844574759
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DescriptionReviewsContentsAuthors Cover Designer

In 1937, when Walt Disney released Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, the film
became an immediate, international sensation. Years earlier, when Disney
decided to produce Snow White, his first animated feature-length film, even he
couldn't have imagined the hundreds of artists required, the cost involved, or
the necessary technological innovations. But all of this effort resulted in a film
experience like no other. Fans marvelled at the lush colour palette, the
seemingly three-dimensional space, the operatic dependence on songs to tell
the story, and the compelling characterisations.

Snow White appealed to low and highbrow alike, from the teenagers who
invented 'The Dopey Dance' to many of the great museums of the US, which
proudly collected celluloid images from the film. Disney's Technicolor cartoon
bridged apparent gaps between city and town, between age groups, between
classes. Critics celebrated it as an instant classic.

Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs now stands as one of the most important of all
Hollywood films, and its influence on movies – by Orson Welles, Michael Powell,
and many others – extends to the present day. Based on extensive research in
materials from the period of the film's production and distribution, Eric
Smoodin's study presents a careful history of the events that led up to Snow
White, the trajectory of Disney's career that made this extraordinary project a
logical next step, the reception of the film in the US and around the world, and
its impact on so many aspects of contemporary culture.

This special edition of Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs is published to celebrate
the 20th anniversary of the BFI Film Classics series.


Description

In 1937, when Walt Disney released Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, the film
became an immediate, international sensation. Years earlier, when Disney
decided to produce Snow White, his first animated feature-length film, even he
couldn't have imagined the hundreds of artists required, the cost involved, or
the necessary technological innovations. But all of this effort resulted in a film
experience like no other. Fans marvelled at the lush colour palette, the
seemingly three-dimensional space, the operatic dependence on songs to tell
the story, and the compelling characterisations.

Snow White appealed to low and highbrow alike, from the teenagers who
invented 'The Dopey Dance' to many of the great museums of the US, which
proudly collected celluloid images from the film. Disney's Technicolor cartoon
bridged apparent gaps between city and town, between age groups, between
classes. Critics celebrated it as an instant classic.

Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs now stands as one of the most important of all
Hollywood films, and its influence on movies – by Orson Welles, Michael Powell,
and many others – extends to the present day. Based on extensive research in
materials from the period of the film's production and distribution, Eric
Smoodin's study presents a careful history of the events that led up to Snow
White, the trajectory of Disney's career that made this extraordinary project a
logical next step, the reception of the film in the US and around the world, and
its impact on so many aspects of contemporary culture.

This special edition of Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs is published to celebrate
the 20th anniversary of the BFI Film Classics series.


Reviews

'...gives us the essential background...' - Total Film


Contents

Preface
Pre-History
Production
The Film
The Response
Afterlife
Conclusion
Notes
Bibliography
Credits


Authors

ERIC SMOODIN is Professor of American Studies and Cinema and
Technocultural Studies, University of California, Davis. His most recent books
are Regarding Frank Capra: Audience, Celebrity, and American Film Studies,
1930–1960
(2004) and Looking Past the Screen: Case Studies in American Film
History and Method
(co-edited with Jon Lewis, 2007).


Cover Designer

Su Blackwell (sculpture)

www.sublackwell.co.uk

Your background

I grew up in Sheffield, and moved to London in 2001 to study Textiles at Royal College of Art. Since leaving college I have been making sculptures from old books, and bits of paper.

Could you explain the concept of your cover design? How does your artwork convey the themes/motifs of Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs?

I wanted to convey some of the haunting, frightening aspects of the film, such as the part where Snow White is abandoned in the woods.

What techniques and materials did you use to create your artwork?

I used a second-hand book by Andrew Lang, cutting out pages with a scalpel from the original story that Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs was based on, Snow White and Rose Red. With my templates cut out, I then painted Snow White, and the apples red, and assembled the final piece with wire.

What is your earliest film memory?

My earliest fillm memory is going to the Odeon in Sheffield to see E.T. with my dad. Just me and him. I was six years old. I remember it being special because it was something we were doing together. I remember crying at the end, when E.T. boards his mother-ship to leave Earth. The music score still brings a tear to my eye now.

What inspires you?

Reading books, and looking at the old illustrations.

What are you working on now?

I've just finished working on illustrating a children's book of fairytales. All of the works in the book will be on display in London at the end of the year, and I am preparing them for the Show now.