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01 Aug 2012
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£12.99
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9781844575169
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DescriptionContentsAuthors Cover Designer

The Wizard of Oz 'was my very first literary influence,' writes Salman Rushdie in his
account of the great MGM children's classic. At the age of ten he had written a story,
'Over the Rainbow', about a colourful fantasy world. But for Rushdie The Wizard of Oz
is more than a children's film, and more than a fantasy. It's a story whose driving
force is the inadequacy of adults, in which 'the weakness of grown-ups forces
children to take control of their own destinies'. And Rushdie rejects the conventional
view that its fantasy of escape from reality ends with a comforting return to home,
sweet home. On the contrary, it is a film that speaks to the exile. The Wizard of Oz
shows that imagination can become reality, that there is no such place like home,
or rather that the only home is the one we make for ourselves.
Rushdie's brilliant insights into a film more often seen than written about are
rounded off with his typically scintillating short story, 'At the Auction of the Ruby
Slippers,' about the day when Dorothy's red shoes are knocked down to $15,000 at a
sale of MGM props …
In his foreword to this special edition, published to celebrate the 20th anniversary of
the BFI Film Classics series, Rushdie looks back to the circumstances in which he
wrote the book, when, in the wake of the controversy surrounding The Satanic Verses
and the issue of a fatwa against him, the idea of home and exile held a particular
resonance.


Description

The Wizard of Oz 'was my very first literary influence,' writes Salman Rushdie in his
account of the great MGM children's classic. At the age of ten he had written a story,
'Over the Rainbow', about a colourful fantasy world. But for Rushdie The Wizard of Oz
is more than a children's film, and more than a fantasy. It's a story whose driving
force is the inadequacy of adults, in which 'the weakness of grown-ups forces
children to take control of their own destinies'. And Rushdie rejects the conventional
view that its fantasy of escape from reality ends with a comforting return to home,
sweet home. On the contrary, it is a film that speaks to the exile. The Wizard of Oz
shows that imagination can become reality, that there is no such place like home,
or rather that the only home is the one we make for ourselves.
Rushdie's brilliant insights into a film more often seen than written about are
rounded off with his typically scintillating short story, 'At the Auction of the Ruby
Slippers,' about the day when Dorothy's red shoes are knocked down to $15,000 at a
sale of MGM props …
In his foreword to this special edition, published to celebrate the 20th anniversary of
the BFI Film Classics series, Rushdie looks back to the circumstances in which he
wrote the book, when, in the wake of the controversy surrounding The Satanic Verses
and the issue of a fatwa against him, the idea of home and exile held a particular
resonance.


Contents

Foreword
A Short Text About Magic
At the Auction of the Ruby Slippers
Credits
Bibliography


Authors

SALMAN RUSHDIE is the author of eleven previous novels – Luka and the Fire
of Life, Grimus, Midnight's Children (for which he won the Booker Prize and the
Best of the Booker), Shame, The Satanic Verses, Haroun and the Sea of Stories,
The Moor's Last Sigh, The Ground Beneath Her Feet, Fury, Shalimar the Clown and
The Enchantress of Florence – and one collection of short stories, East, West.
He has also published three works of nonfiction – The Jaguar Smile, Imaginary
Homelands: Essays and Criticism 1981–1991, and Step Across This Line – and coedited
two anthologies, Mirrorwork and Best American Short Stories 2008. He is
the former president of American PEN.


Cover Designer

Chloe Giordano

www.chloegiordano.com

@ChloeGiordano

Your background

I studied Illustration at the University of the West of England in Bristol, where in my final year I discovered my love of sewing and book design, and decided to put the two together. I now live and work in Buckinghamshire.

Could you explain the concept of your cover design? How does your artwork convey the themes/motifs of The Wizard of Oz?

My cover was largely inspired by the colour theme of The Wizard of Oz. I've always loved the contrast of the brighter colours against the soft baby blues of the skies and Dorothy's dress, so my immediate reaction to the brief was to try and bring this together in my own work. I couldn't leave out the iconic yellow brick road, so in making it form the text itself I've tried to make it an integral part of the design rather than just a prop.

What techniques and materials did you use to create your artwork?

The design itself is sewn onto a piece of hand dyed calico, with a range of embroidery thread. I hand sew all my work, which I feel gives me the ability to work into minute detail but also to make sure the whole piece flows together.

What is your earliest film memory?

I think it was possibly seeing The Lion King at the cinema and beginning an obsession with it that lasted most of my childhood. That may well have been my first ever trip to the cinema, come to think of it!

What inspires you?

Nature, especially that around me now I'm living in the Chilterns. A lot of my work explores the inherent patterns and detail we find in plants and wildlife and trying to recreate it in a new format. I also love the tactile nature of my work and a lot of my pieces are spurred by me trying to solve a problem of how to actually bring an idea to fruition.

What are you working on now?

I'm currently creating a one off piece for an exhibition later in the year. I'm also trying to get back into making more 3D work.