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31 Jul 2012
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£12.99
|Paperback In Stock
  
9781844575220
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DescriptionContentsAuthors Cover Designer Reviews

Ridley Scott's dystopian classic Blade Runner, an adaptation of Philip K. Dick's novel, Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?, combines noir with science fiction to create a groundbreaking cyberpunk vision of urban life in the twenty-first century. With replicants on the run, the rain-drenched Los Angeles which Blade Runner imagines is a city of oppression and enclosure, but a city in which transgression and disorder can always erupt. Graced by stunning sets, lighting, effects, costumes and photography, Blade Runner succeeds brilliantly in depicting a world at once uncannily familiar and startlingly new.   In his innovative and nuanced reading, Scott Bukatman details the making of Blade Runner and its steadily improving fortunes following its release in 1982. He situates the film in terms of debates about postmodernism, which have informed much of the criticism devoted to it, but argues that its tensions derive also from the quintessentially twentieth-century, modernist experience of the city – as a space both imprisoning and liberating.
  In his foreword to this special edition, published to celebrate the 20th anniversary of the BFI Film Classics series, Bukatman suggests that Blade Runner 's visual complexity allows it to translate successfully to the world of high definition and on-demand home cinema. He looks back to the sciencefiction tradition of the early 1980s, and on to the key changes in the 'final' version of the film in 2007, which risk diminishing the sense of instability created in the original.


Description

Ridley Scott's dystopian classic Blade Runner, an adaptation of Philip K. Dick's novel, Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?, combines noir with science fiction to create a groundbreaking cyberpunk vision of urban life in the twenty-first century. With replicants on the run, the rain-drenched Los Angeles which Blade Runner imagines is a city of oppression and enclosure, but a city in which transgression and disorder can always erupt. Graced by stunning sets, lighting, effects, costumes and photography, Blade Runner succeeds brilliantly in depicting a world at once uncannily familiar and startlingly new.   In his innovative and nuanced reading, Scott Bukatman details the making of Blade Runner and its steadily improving fortunes following its release in 1982. He situates the film in terms of debates about postmodernism, which have informed much of the criticism devoted to it, but argues that its tensions derive also from the quintessentially twentieth-century, modernist experience of the city – as a space both imprisoning and liberating.
  In his foreword to this special edition, published to celebrate the 20th anniversary of the BFI Film Classics series, Bukatman suggests that Blade Runner 's visual complexity allows it to translate successfully to the world of high definition and on-demand home cinema. He looks back to the sciencefiction tradition of the early 1980s, and on to the key changes in the 'final' version of the film in 2007, which risk diminishing the sense of instability created in the original.


Contents

Foreword
Acknowledgements
Introduction: On Seeing, Science Fiction and Cities
Filming Blade Runner
The Metropolis
Replicants and Mental Life
Conclusion
Notes
Credits
Bibliography


Authors

SCOTT BUKATMAN is a cultural theorist and Professor of Film and Media Studies at Stanford University. His research explores how popular media such as film, comics and animation mediate between new technologies and human perceptual and bodily experience.


Cover Designer

Paul Pope
@pulph0pe

Could you explain the concept of your cover design? How does your artwork convey the themes/motifs of blade runner?

I approached the cover the way classic Ukiyo-E printmakers such as Utamaro and Hiroshige portrayed Kabuki actors in prints celebrating the actors in their greatest roles, yet to do the drawing with a strong sense of Expressionism. I tried to find the most iconic moment of Rutger Hauer's performance, and exaggerate the intensity of the emotions using harsh, expressive brushwork and color.

What techniques and materials did you use to create your artwork?

The image is mixed media, about 11x24 inches on heavy newsprint. Ebony pencil, Japanese Sumi ink, watercolor, some digital color. I used bamboo and Windsor-Newton Series 7 brushes.

What is your earliest film memory?

I have a very clear memory of being very young and watching (what I much later realized to be) Jan Svankmeyer's stop-motion film, A Game With Stones (Czech: Hra s kameny). It's also one of my earliest memories.

What inspires you?

Memory. Music and the biographies of musicians...Bruce Lee...the films of Tarkovsky and Jodorwsky, lots of artists – everything from Moebius to George Groz to Tapies.

What are you working on now?

I'm in the middle of a very long graphic novel project for First Second/MacMillan, called Battling Boy. I'm also working on book about dreams and lucid dreaming, short comics based on the ideas of Carl Jung, for my French publisher, Dargaud. Both are set to be 2013 publications.

 

 


Reviews

'Bukatman's brilliantly succinct yet wide-ranging analysis of Blade Runner was published in 1997 and its reissue is timely: this year marks the 30th anniversary of Ridley Scott's immensely influential SF film based on a Philip K Dick novel.' Guardian

Read the whole review now.