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In the Society of Fascists
 
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In the Society of Fascists
Acclamation, Acquiescence, and Agency in Mussolini's Italy
 
 
Palgrave Macmillan
 
 
 
 
 
 
06 Sep 2012
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£60.00
|Hardback In Stock
  
9780230392922
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DescriptionReviewsContentsAuthors

It has been a commonplace in Italian scholarship that Fascism enjoyed its long tenure not through terror but because of widespread popular consensus. By contrast a recent wave of research has reintroduced the notion of 'totalitarianism' to discussions of Mussolini's regime—yet often without testing the degree of active participation or opposition. So what was the relationship between Fascists and followers, party and people? Bringing together young Italian scholars—many appearing for the first time in English—engaged in new research on both elites and ordinary people, this volume offers a wide-ranging, in-depth analysis of Italian society's involvement in Fascism.


Description

It has been a commonplace in Italian scholarship that Fascism enjoyed its long tenure not through terror but because of widespread popular consensus. By contrast a recent wave of research has reintroduced the notion of 'totalitarianism' to discussions of Mussolini's regime—yet often without testing the degree of active participation or opposition. So what was the relationship between Fascists and followers, party and people? Bringing together young Italian scholars—many appearing for the first time in English—engaged in new research on both elites and ordinary people, this volume offers a wide-ranging, in-depth analysis of Italian society's involvement in Fascism.


Reviews

"The contributing authors are young scholars, most of them Italian, and their essays showcase important recent approaches to the study of Italian fascism. Some of the chapters draw on their authors' previously published Italian langauge monographs, while others represent newer, ongoing research. The book thus serves to introduce English-language scholars to a new generation of scholarship that builds upon but also moves beyond earlier debates and approaches." - Journal of Modern Italian Studies


Contents

Historians, Fascism, and Italian Society: Mapping the Limits of Consent; R.Pergher & G.Albanese
Borghesi in Uniform: Masculinity, Militarism, and the Brutalization of Politics from World War I to the Rise of Fascism; L.Benadusi
Violence and Political Participation during the Rise of Fascism (1919-1926); G.Albanese
Consent, Mobilization, and Participation: The Rise of the Middle Class and its Support for the Fascist Regime; T.Baris
Neither Bluff nor Revolution: The Corporations and the Consolidation of the Fascist Regime (1925-1926); M.Pasetti
The Entrepreneurial Bourgeoisie and Fascism; A.Gagliardi
The Allure of the Welfare State; C.Giorgi
The 'New Racist Man': Italian Society and the Fascist Anti-Jewish Laws; V.Galimi
The Consent of Memory: Recovering Fascist-Settler Relations in Libya; R.Pergher
The Royal Army's Betrayal? Two Different Italian Policies in Yugoslavia (1941-1943); E.Gobetti
Clio Among the Camicie Nere: Italian Historians and their Allegiances to Fascism (1930s-1940s); M.Angelini


Authors

Giulia Albanese is an assistant professor at the University of Padova. Her research focuses on the origins of fascism, political violence, and authoritarian cultures. Currently she works on a comparative study examining political violence and institutional crisis in Spain, Portugal, and Italy in the 1920s. She is the author of  La Marcia su Roma (2006) and Alle origini del fascismo. La violenza politica a Venezia (1919-1922) (2001).

Roberta Pergher is an assistant professor at the University of Kansas. She has been a Max Weber fellow at the European University Institute in Florence, Italy and a postdoctoral fellow at the Eisenberg Institute for Historical Studies at the University of Michigan. Her research and teaching interests are centered in the history of Modern Europe, in particular the history of Italy and Germany, and include the topics of comparative fascism, colonialism, and borderland studies. She is the author of several articles on Fascist demographic policy and settler experiences.