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17 Oct 2012
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£63.00
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9781137008688
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DescriptionReviewsContentsAuthors

Crime, Justice and Social Democracy is a provocative and thoughtful collection of timely reflections on the state of social democracy and its inextricable links to crime and justice. Authored by some of the world's leading thinkers from the UK, US, Canada and Australia, with a preface from Professor David Garland of New York University, this volume provides a powerful social democratic critique of neoliberal regimes of governance and crime control on an international scale. Social democratic values raise broad questions about government, ethics, and the exercise of power in criminal justice institutions; each chapter here engages with how this might occur and with what consequences. The contributions to this volume, while critical and hard hitting, also boldly envision a more socially just criminal justice politic. This collection is essential reading for activists, scholars, legislators, politicians and policy makers who are concerned with promoting, imagining and understanding socially sustaining societies.


Description

Crime, Justice and Social Democracy is a provocative and thoughtful collection of timely reflections on the state of social democracy and its inextricable links to crime and justice. Authored by some of the world's leading thinkers from the UK, US, Canada and Australia, with a preface from Professor David Garland of New York University, this volume provides a powerful social democratic critique of neoliberal regimes of governance and crime control on an international scale. Social democratic values raise broad questions about government, ethics, and the exercise of power in criminal justice institutions; each chapter here engages with how this might occur and with what consequences. The contributions to this volume, while critical and hard hitting, also boldly envision a more socially just criminal justice politic. This collection is essential reading for activists, scholars, legislators, politicians and policy makers who are concerned with promoting, imagining and understanding socially sustaining societies.


Reviews

"This edited collection offers a tantalizing look at the future directions that criminological analysis, politics and practice could take in the wake of the crisis in neoliberal and free-market hegemony [...] It is a landmark text which is essential reading for scholars of
Criminology, Sociology, Social Geography and Policy studies, and would be a suitable [...] book for undergraduate and postgraduate courses on contemporary or critical issues in Criminology."
British Journal of Criminology


Contents

List of Tables and Figures
Preface; D.Garland
Notes on the Contributors
List of Abbreviations
Introducing New International Perspectives on Crime, Justice and Social
Democracy; K.Carrington, M.Ball, E.O'Brien & J.Tauri
PART I: SOCIAL JUSTICE, GOVERNANCE AND ETHICS
The Sustaining Society; E.Currie
Democracy and the Project of Liberal Inclusion: Values, Immigration and Criminal Justice; S.Karstedt
Justice Matters: Australia's Social Inclusion Policy; J.Bessant
PART II: PENAL POLICY AND PUNISHMENT IN THE GLOBAL ERA
Penal Policy and the Social Democratic Image of Society; J.Pratt & A.Eriksson
Imprisonment Rates, Social Democracy, Neo–liberalism and Justice Reinvestment; D.Brown
PART III: THE LEGITIMACY OF CRIMINAL JUSTICE: CONTRADICTIONS BETWEEN SYSTEM, PRACTICES AND EXPERIENCES
Penal Imaginaries: The Ironical Play of Rehabilitation within Crime, Justice and Democracy Discourses; P.Carlen
Punishment and 'The People': Rescuing Populism From its Critics; R.Hogg
Image Work(s): 'Simulated Policing' and the New Police (Popularity) Culture; M.Lee & A.McGovern 
Islamaphobia, Human Rights and the 'War on Terror': Labour's Record in Britain; S.Poynting
PART IV: SEX, GENDER AND JUSTICE
Sex Work, Sexual Exploitations and Consumerism; J.Phoenix
Tactics of Antifeminist Backlash: The View from Advocates for Abused Women; M.Dragiewicz
Understanding Woman Abuse in Canada: Past, Present, and Future; W.S.DeKeseredy
Heteronormativity, Homonormativity, and Intimate Partner Violence in Non–Heterosexual and/or Non–Cisgendered Relationships: Some Unintended Consequences of Inclusive Discourses; M.Ball
Social Change in the Australian Judiciary: Gender Diversity; S.R.Anleu & K.Mack
PART V: INDIGENOUS JUSTICE 
An Indigenous Critique of Authoritarian Criminology; J.M.Tauri
Reproducing Criminality: How Cure Can Enhance Cause; G.Cowlishaw
Indigenous Women: Missing Subjects of Penal Discourse and Penal Politics; J.Stubbs
Modes of Criminal Justice, Indigenous Youth and Social Democracy; C.Hearfield & J.Scott
PART VI: ECO–JUSTICE AND ENVIRONMENTAL CRIME
Eco Mafia and Environmental Crime; R.Walters
Corporate Risk, Mining Camps and the Political Economy of Knowledge; K.Carrington
PART VII: GLOBAL JUSTICE, TRANS–BORDER CRIME AND HUMAN RIGHTS
Ideal Victims in Human Trafficking Awareness Campaigns; E.O'Brien
State Crime and the Criminalisation of People–Smuggling: The Australian Experience; M.Grewcock
Against Social Democracy: Mobility Rights for a Globalising World; L.Weber


Authors

KERRY CARRINGTON is Professor and Head of the School of Justice at Queensland University of Technology, Australia and has an established international reputation in the field of criminology and especially critical and feminist criminology.
MATTHEW BALL is Lecturer in the School of Justice, Queensland University of Technology, Australia. He has published in the fields of criminology, criminal and social justice, social theory, and sexuality studies.
ERIN O'BRIEN is Lecturer in the School of Justice, Queensland University of Technology, Australia. Her research focuses on policy-making and political activism in relation to key social justice issues including human trafficking, women's rights and environmentalism.
JUAN MARCELLUS TAURI is Lecturer in the School of Justice, Queensland University of Technology, Australia. He specialises on research on state policy responses to First Nation crime and critique of the formal justice system, youth gangs and the globalisation of crime control products.