Palgrave Macmillan Home
Login or Register    Shopping Basket Shopping Basket
Search 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
10 Oct 2012
|
£63.00
|Hardback In Stock
  
9781137017871
||
 
 
10 Oct 2012
|
£20.99
|Paperback In Stock
  
9781137017888
||
 
 
eBooks ebook on Palgrave Connect  ebook available via library subscriptions ebook on ebooks.com 
 
 


OrderHelpBox
                                                                                                                                              returns, payment and delivery


DescriptionReviewsContentsAuthors

Every time you consult a calendar or clock, other people are thinking for you. Most users of these tools only know how to interpret the representations of time these objects provide, not the logics behind the representations. Those logics were others' ideas. This book looks at how the objects we use to think about time shape our thoughts. Such objects empower us to think about time certain ways, but they also contain hidden assumptions about time that deflect our awareness away from the complicated rhythms of our lives and our world. Because time ties together so many aspects of our lives, this book is able to explore the nexus of objects, cognition, culture, and even biology, and to do so in relationship to globalization. By using ethnographic and historical data, Birth argues that we must recognize the cognitive effects of our timekeeping devices, and that we must also recognize that they do not adequately capture many important aspects of time or life.


Description

Every time you consult a calendar or clock, other people are thinking for you. Most users of these tools only know how to interpret the representations of time these objects provide, not the logics behind the representations. Those logics were others' ideas. This book looks at how the objects we use to think about time shape our thoughts. Such objects empower us to think about time certain ways, but they also contain hidden assumptions about time that deflect our awareness away from the complicated rhythms of our lives and our world. Because time ties together so many aspects of our lives, this book is able to explore the nexus of objects, cognition, culture, and even biology, and to do so in relationship to globalization. By using ethnographic and historical data, Birth argues that we must recognize the cognitive effects of our timekeeping devices, and that we must also recognize that they do not adequately capture many important aspects of time or life.


Reviews

"This book will be invaluable for cognitive anthropologists, scholars of material culture, and theorists interested in time historically and in our global age . . . All of us feel bound to our alarm clocks, wristwatches, and daily planners, but few of us have given thought to where these devices come from and how they have altered us as social and biological beings. In this engaging and intellectually far-reaching work, Birth has done much of the work for us." - American Anthropologist
 
"An important contribution to the anthropology of time and material culture studies, this volume takes as its primary point of departure that the mechanisms for 'telling' time (the author focuses on clocks and calendars) are engaged in shaping our experience and subsequent enactment of temporal realities as much as they are nominally thought of as representing them." - American Ethnologist

"An admirable attempt to ground the study of time within the empirical specificity of objects and culture." - Time and Society


Contents

The Material Invention of Time

A Necromantic Device, or How Clocks Think

Calendrical Uniformity versus Planned Uncanniness

Polyrhythmic Temporalities (Confounding the Artifacts)

Globeness: Time and the Embodied, Biological Consequences of Globalization

Creeping Cognitive Homochronicity and the End of the Time of Earth


Authors

KEVIN BIRTH is a Professor of Anthropology at Queen's College, CUNY, USA His previous book, Any Time is Trinidad Time (1999), was the subject of a 2002 article in Scientific American. Birth is a member of the International Society for the Study of Time.