Palgrave Macmillan Home
Login or Register    Shopping Basket Shopping Basket
Search 
 
 
 
 
Leadership in Global Institution Building
 
   Enlarge Image
 
 
Leadership in Global Institution Building
Minerva's Rule
Edited by Yves Tiberghien
 
 
Palgrave Macmillan
 
 
 
 
 
21 Jan 2013
|
£63.00
|Hardback In Stock
  
9781137023728
||
 
 
eBooks  ebook available via library subscriptions ebook on ebooks.com google eBooks 
 
 


OrderHelpBox
                                                                                                                                              returns, payment and delivery


DescriptionReviewsContentsAuthors

Since 1995 the world experienced a period of significant advance in international law, norms, and institutions. Progress was particularly intense in the fields of global environment, human security, cultural diversity, and human rights. This wave of multilateral activity led to milestones such as the Kyoto Protocol on climate change (1997), the landmine treaty, the International Criminal Court, or the UNESCO Convention on cultural diversity. Remarkably, most of these advances were not US-led, as in the past. What caused such a burst in global institutions and who were the key founding fathers?
The book reveals the crucial roles played by the European Union, Japan, and Canada (so-called 'Minervian actors') in this fascinating period. It also reveals that they acted with various partners and sub-state actors and with a variety of motivations: they sometimes sought to balance against US dominance; they engaged in normative work with global civil society; or they sought to demonstrate international leadership to their home audience.


Description

Since 1995 the world experienced a period of significant advance in international law, norms, and institutions. Progress was particularly intense in the fields of global environment, human security, cultural diversity, and human rights. This wave of multilateral activity led to milestones such as the Kyoto Protocol on climate change (1997), the landmine treaty, the International Criminal Court, or the UNESCO Convention on cultural diversity. Remarkably, most of these advances were not US-led, as in the past. What caused such a burst in global institutions and who were the key founding fathers?
The book reveals the crucial roles played by the European Union, Japan, and Canada (so-called 'Minervian actors') in this fascinating period. It also reveals that they acted with various partners and sub-state actors and with a variety of motivations: they sometimes sought to balance against US dominance; they engaged in normative work with global civil society; or they sought to demonstrate international leadership to their home audience.


Reviews

The post-Cold War order is unique in the history of world politics for having a hegemon generally unwilling or unable to lead. Who else has tried? When did they succeed, and when did they fail? What explains the difference? This fascinating collection offers a fresh perspective on these important questions. Theoretically creative and empirically rich, it helps us understand the patchy recent history of governance innovation better than any work to date.
 
David Welch, CIGI Chair of Global Security, Balsillie School of International Affairs and Professor of Political Science, University of Waterloo, Canada
 
A fine analysis of the institution-building process under way at global level, by a range of highly qualified authors. A must-read for those who want to make sense of the transformations of global governance since the turn of the century.

Renaud Dehousse, Jean Monnet Professor of EU Law and Politics, Director of the Centre d'études européennes, Sciences Po, Paris, France


Contents

Preface
Acknowledgements
Notes on the Contributors
Introduction: Minervian Actors and the Paradox of Post-1995 Global Institution-Building; Y.Tiberghien
PART I: MINERVIAN SETTINGS
Varieties of Minervians: Scorecards and Patterns; Y.Tiberghien
The European Union as a Minervian Actor in Global Institution Building; I.Manners
Canada's Minervian Moment – Global Activism and Domestic Politics; K.R.Nossal
PART II: THE COMPETITIVE MODE
The UNESCO Declaration of Cultural Diversity; J.Chan
International Accounting Standards; N.Véron
PART III: THE NORMATIVE MODE
The Ottawa Process: Domestic Interests, Transnational Civil Society, and State Identity; P.Flowers
The Resilience of CITES Regime and Diffused Normative Community; I.Sakaguchi
Minerva's Allies: States, Secretariats, and Individuals in the Emergence of the Responsibility to Protect Norm; K.Coleman
The Battle over the Peace-building Norm after the Iraq War; D.Higashi
PART IV: THE POLITICAL LEADERSHIP MODE
Minervian Politics and International Chemicals Policy; H.Selin
Enough Rope: the Role of Minervian Actors in Establishing the International Criminal Court; J.Lee
The Last Call for the Minerva's Owl: The Politics of the 11th Hour in Negotiating the Nagoya Protocol at the CBD COP-10 Meeting; E.Feditchkina
PART V: CONCLUSION
The End of the Minervian Moment; Z.Laidi
Successes and Limits of the Minervian Moment; Y.Tiberghien
References
Index


Authors

Yves Tiberghien is Associate Professor, Department of Political Science, University of British Columbia, Canada.