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Women of Letters, Manuscript Circulation, and Print Afterlives in the Eighteenth Century
 
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Women of Letters, Manuscript Circulation, and Print Afterlives in the Eighteenth Century
Elizabeth Rowe, Catharine Cockburn and Elizabeth Carter
 
 
Palgrave Macmillan
 
 
 
 
 
12 Jan 2013
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£58.00
|Hardback In Stock
  
9781137033567
||
 
 
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DescriptionReviewsContentsAuthors

Women of Letters, Manuscript Circulation and Print Afterlives in the Eighteenth Century: Elizabeth Rowe, Catharine Cockburn and Elizabeth Carter tells the stories of these women's writing lives: the social and literary contexts which shaped their allegiance to manuscript circulation; the histories of their successful as well as failed forays into print; and their agency and/or diffidence in regards to their public careers. At the same time, the work also broaches larger thematic issues: the degree and significance of women's involvement in the English republic of letters—particularly in relation to their relevance and engagement in contemporary debates within Christianity; the evidence for a more robust climate of manuscript circulation in the long eighteenth century; and reception history—specifically the notion of print afterlives and the critical tradition.


Description

Women of Letters, Manuscript Circulation and Print Afterlives in the Eighteenth Century: Elizabeth Rowe, Catharine Cockburn and Elizabeth Carter tells the stories of these women's writing lives: the social and literary contexts which shaped their allegiance to manuscript circulation; the histories of their successful as well as failed forays into print; and their agency and/or diffidence in regards to their public careers. At the same time, the work also broaches larger thematic issues: the degree and significance of women's involvement in the English republic of letters—particularly in relation to their relevance and engagement in contemporary debates within Christianity; the evidence for a more robust climate of manuscript circulation in the long eighteenth century; and reception history—specifically the notion of print afterlives and the critical tradition.


Reviews

'This gracefully written book is an original and thought-provoking contribution to our understanding of three of the most intelligent of the British Enlightenment women. Bigold's careful treatment of their writings, published and manuscript, and especially her deeply knowledgeable presentation of their engagement with the most important philosophical and literary debates of their times is a major contribution.' - Paula R. Backscheider, Philpott-Stevens Eminent Scholar, Auburn University, USA


Contents

Preface
Acknowledgements
List of abbreviations
Note on transcription
Introduction
Letter-writing, Community, and Virtuous Exemplarity: Elizabeth Rowe's Theatre of Happiness
A Saint Everlasting: Elizabeth Rowe and Biographical Exemplarity
'The new and untrodden path': Catharine Cockburn, Philosophy and the Republic of Letters
'[H]ow Obscure her Lot': Catharine Cockburn's Double Afterlife
Elizabeth Carter: 'a very extraordinary Phaenomenon in the Republick of Letters'
Elizabeth Carter and the Theatrum Mundi
Bibliography
Notes
Index


Authors

MELANIE BIGOLD is a Lecturer at Cardiff University, UK. She has published work on eighteenth-century women writers, and transcribed and edited manuscripts for The Slave Trade Debate. She is currently working on a joint biography of George Ballard and Elizabeth Elstob, and leading a project on marginalia and provenance in the Cardiff Rare Books collection.