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Knowledge, Pedagogy, and Postmulticulturalism
 
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Knowledge, Pedagogy, and Postmulticulturalism
Shifting the Locus of Learning in Urban Teacher Education
Edited by Gay Wilgus
 
 
Palgrave Macmillan
 
 
 
 
 
 
24 May 2013
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£55.00
|Hardback In Stock
  
9781137275899
||
 
 
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DescriptionReviewsContentsAuthors

Knowledge, Pedagogy, and Postmulticulturalism opens for examination the research and experimental pedagogies of a teacher education faculty at a large, urban, public university, where teacher candidates from working-class and ethnic and linguistic minority backgrounds are prepared to work with learners from similar backgrounds. The pedagogies discussed have been expressly designed to elicit the funds of knowledge and community cultural wealth of these teacher education candidates. The research in this volume calls attention to the distinctive, complex perspectives that individuals from historically marginalized groups bring to the university classroom, and demonstrates how these valuable perspectives can be brought front and center in the university's teacher education curriculum. It counters contemporary trends of discouraging and preventing students and teachers from critically and intellectually engaging with issues of which knowledges are taught, and how.


Description

Knowledge, Pedagogy, and Postmulticulturalism opens for examination the research and experimental pedagogies of a teacher education faculty at a large, urban, public university, where teacher candidates from working-class and ethnic and linguistic minority backgrounds are prepared to work with learners from similar backgrounds. The pedagogies discussed have been expressly designed to elicit the funds of knowledge and community cultural wealth of these teacher education candidates. The research in this volume calls attention to the distinctive, complex perspectives that individuals from historically marginalized groups bring to the university classroom, and demonstrates how these valuable perspectives can be brought front and center in the university's teacher education curriculum. It counters contemporary trends of discouraging and preventing students and teachers from critically and intellectually engaging with issues of which knowledges are taught, and how.


Reviews

"This important volume puts the pedagogical tire to the road; it demonstrates the efficacy and creativity of critical classroom practice on the ground, and, in so doing, advances the cause of teacher education at a time in which many teachers and students are awakening fitfully from their hypnopompic state and reminding the rest of us that in standing idle we risk being suffocated by our own past. At a time when our social roles as citizens have become increasingly corporatized and instrumentalized in a world which hides necessity in the name of consumer desire, this book offers a beacon of insight into just what can be accomplished in the classroom both to enrich everyday life and to build alternative futures." - Peter McLaren, Professor, University of California, Los Angeles, USA

"Knowledge, Pedagogy, and Postmulticulturalism takes seriously the premise that teacher candidates from working-class and non-dominant backgrounds bring a rich and highly textured perspective to their work and studies. By honoring the funds of knowledge that these students bring to their courses in teacher education, teacher educators can leverage the affordances of their experiences. This book raises important questions about the alternative canons that can be incorporated into a commitment to 'community cultural wealth' that can be a centerpiece for the curricula in urban teacher education programs. Given the current debates concerning teacher preparation programs, this book is timely, original, and provocative." - Norma González, Professor, The University of Arizona, USA


Contents

Preface; Stanley Aronowitz
Introduction
1. Discovering Inquiry-based Learning Through Oral History Projects; Megan Blumenreich
2. 'I'm not just gonna settle for anything:' Inciting Teacher Efficacy through Critical Pedagogies; Vicki Garavuso
3. Intertextuality, Music and Critical Pedagogy; Charles Malone
4. Transforming Classrooms: Teacher Education, Social Studies, and Curriculum Drama; Catherine Franklin
5. Incorporating Teacher Candidates' Prior Beliefs and Funds of Knowledge in Theories of Child Development; Amita Gupta
6. Prioritizing the Social in Academic Writing: The Experiences of Ethnically, Linguistically and Generationally Diverse Early Childhood Teacher Candidates; Gay Wilgus
7. Special Education Teacher Preparation: Growing Disability Studies in the Absence of Resistance; Linda Ware
8. Postmulticulturalism: Cultivating Alternative Canons, a Critical Vernacular and Student-Generated Understandings of their 'Lived-Situatedness'; Gay Wilgus
Appendix A: Writing Background Survey
Appendix B: Interview Questions


Authors

Gay Wilgus is Assistant Professor in the Graduate Program in Early Childhood Education at the City College of New York, CUNY, USA. Her research and publications have focused on the experiences of young children of immigrant families in public schools in the US, France and Spain. Her current research centers on the experiences of mothers from immigrant backgrounds as they seek services and schooling for their children with disabilities in New York City.