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Narrative and Truth
 
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Narrative and Truth
An Ethical and Dynamic Paradigm for the Humanities
 
 
Palgrave Macmillan
 
 
 
 
 
15 Oct 2012
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£58.00
|Hardback In Stock
  
9781137275448
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DescriptionReviewsContentsAuthors

Narrative explanations are preferred over non-narrative, axiomatically, in the humanities. They are more truthful in two senses. Firstly they correspond more closely than a-narrative theories to reality. Secondly they enable, at the very least, value-loaded normative inferences. This is particularly the case when aesthetics is added to the mix. Emslie examines this argument over a wide terrain and over materials ranging from high to popular culture and from close analysis to anecdote, including Marxist Humanism, Feminist literary praxis, Freud, German idealism, discourse ethics, realist aesthetics, Brecht, and sports.


Description

Narrative explanations are preferred over non-narrative, axiomatically, in the humanities. They are more truthful in two senses. Firstly they correspond more closely than a-narrative theories to reality. Secondly they enable, at the very least, value-loaded normative inferences. This is particularly the case when aesthetics is added to the mix. Emslie examines this argument over a wide terrain and over materials ranging from high to popular culture and from close analysis to anecdote, including Marxist Humanism, Feminist literary praxis, Freud, German idealism, discourse ethics, realist aesthetics, Brecht, and sports.


Reviews

"An independent scholar and author of Richard Wagner and the Centrality of Love (2010), Emslie argues for the value of narrative explanations in humanistic writing. He develops this argument through the analysis of an unusually wide-ranging mix of theoretical and critical fields that includes Marxist humanism, feminist theory and literary criticism, psychoanalysis, and German idealist philosophy, along with a number of eclectic subjects - such as sports and conspiracy theories - by which he explains the value of the kinds of narrative explanation for which he argues . . . This is not a book for those uninitiated into the language and content of critical theory, but it usefully explores the form and purpose of writing in the humanities. Summing Up: Recommended. Graduate students, researchers, faculty." - CHOICE


Contents

An Overview
Marxist Humanism: Hegel, Marx, Lukács, Eagleton, Habermas
Women and Writing: Women Theorists, Women Novelists, Jane Austen, Charlotte Brontë
Freud: Science as narrative, a perverse and singular teleology, certainty masquerading as doubt
Philosophy and Fatherland: German Transcendentalism, Aesthetics, and Nationalism
Realism: Brecht, Sport, the Bible, Lenin, Conspiracy theories
Death


Authors

BARRY EMSLIE is an independent scholar working in Berlin, Germany. He received his PhD from the University of East London, UK and is the author of Richard Wagner and the Centrality of Love.