Palgrave Macmillan Home
Login or Register    Shopping Basket Shopping Basket
Search 
 
 
 
 
Storytelling: Critical and Creative Approaches
 
   Enlarge Image
 
 
Storytelling: Critical and Creative Approaches
 
 
Palgrave Macmillan
 
 
 
 
 
27 Nov 2013
|
£60.00
|Hardback In Stock
  
9781137349941
||
 
 
eBooks  ebook available via library subscriptions ebook on ebooks.com google eBooks 
 
 


OrderHelpBox
                                                                                                                                              returns, payment and delivery


DescriptionContentsAuthors

In Storytelling: Critical and Creative Approaches award-winning creative artists and scholars explore the power and complexity of stories in a variety of genres and cultures. Storytelling is of crucial importance to narratives of post-coloniality, gender, history, social status and nationhood. This collection of analytical and reflective pieces demonstrates the fundamental role played by imagination in the production and contestation of culture. The writers show how personal and public truths are manufactured, modified and undone through processes of narrativization and storytelling.


Description

In Storytelling: Critical and Creative Approaches award-winning creative artists and scholars explore the power and complexity of stories in a variety of genres and cultures. Storytelling is of crucial importance to narratives of post-coloniality, gender, history, social status and nationhood. This collection of analytical and reflective pieces demonstrates the fundamental role played by imagination in the production and contestation of culture. The writers show how personal and public truths are manufactured, modified and undone through processes of narrativization and storytelling.


Contents

Acknowledgements
Introduction Story Streams: Stories and their Tellers; Jan Shaw
PART I: INDIGENOUS STORIES
1. The State of the Nation's Narratives; Witi Ihimaera
2. Testimonial Textures: Examining the Poetics of Non-Indigenous Stories about Reconciliation; Tom Clark and Ravi de Costa
3. Indigenous literature in the Pacific: The Question of the Didactic in Storytelling; Raylene Ramsay
4. Mother Stories: The Woman Myth in By the Bog of Cats and Tea in a China Cup; Kristen Liesch
5. (Re)telling the Story of the 1994 Tutsi Genocide in Rwanda: Une Saison de Machetes (Machete Season) by Jean Hatzfeld; Narelle Fletcher
PART II: FICTIONAL HISTORY AND HISTORICAL FICTION
6. Transnational Glamour, National Allure: Community, Change and Cliché in Baz Luhrmann's Australia; Meaghan Morris
7. Writing the Story of the Wartime Occupation of the Channel Islands; Peter Goodall
8. War, Wives and Whitewash: The Zookeeper and his Aryan Animals; Julia Petzl-Berney
9. No Man's Land: A Revisionist Story of the Cyprus Problem; Irini Savvides
10. Transnational Storytelling: Visions of Italy in Two New Zealand Novels; Sarah Patricia Hill
PART III: THE SEA OF STORIES
11. Shakespeare and the Sea of Stories; Mark Houlahan
12. Reading Chaucer 'in Parts': The Knight's Tale and The Two Noble Kinsmen; Margaret Rogerson
13. What Women Want: The Shrew's Story; Philippa Kelly
14. Stories of Selves and Infidels: Walter Charleton's Letter to Margaret Cavendish; L. E. Semler
15. 'Telling the story my way': Shakespearean Collaboration and Dialogism in the Secondary School Classroom; Linzy Brady
16. The Tale of Melusine in A. S. Byatt's Possession: Retelling Medieval Stories; Jan Shaw
PART IV: CRITICAL CREATIVITY
17. Redcrosse: Storytelling, Nation and Religion in England; Ewan Fernie
18. Paul Auster's Storytelling in Invisible: The Pleasures of Postmodernity; Rosemary Huisman
19. Emotional Rhythm; Ian David
20. Rogues: A Speculation; Sue Woolfe
21. What Would Happen If ...? A Semi-Memoir of a Semi-Philosophical Musician and Sometime Carpenter; Paul Dresher
Index








Authors

Jan Shaw teaches Middle English Literature in the Department of English at the University of Sydney, Australia. Her research interests include Middle English romance, the fantastic in contemporary literature by women, and feminist and narrative theory. In addition to publishing in these areas, she has also published on narrative theory approaches in leadership studies.

Philippa Kelly has published 8 books and 70 articles. She currently serves as resident dramaturg for the California Shakespeare Theater and production dramaturg for the Oregon Shakespeare Festival. Her most recent book, The King and I, is a personal meditation on contemporary Australian life through the prism of King Lear.

Liam E Semler is Associate Professor of Early Modern Literature, Department of English and Director, Medieval and Early Modern Centre, University of Sydney, Australia. His recent books include, Teaching Shakespeare and Marlowe: Learning versus the System (2013) and (coedited with P. Gay and K. Flaherty) Teaching Shakespeare Beyond the Centre: Australasian Perspectives (2013).