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Palgrave Gothic

Weird Fiction in Britain 1880–1939

Authors: Machin, James

  • Constitutes the first cultural history of weird fiction from a British perspective
  • Demonstrates how weird fiction didn’t start in America with H. P. Lovecraft; it has a far longer and ‘weirder’ history
  • Uses a combination of cultural history, archival research, and literary criticism to excavate weird fiction's complex historical lineage, re-examining its relationship with Modernism
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eBook £47.99
price for United Kingdom (gross)
  • ISBN 978-3-319-90527-3
  • Digitally watermarked, DRM-free
  • Included format: PDF, EPUB
  • ebooks can be used on all reading devices
  • Immediate eBook download after purchase
Hardcover £59.99
price for United Kingdom (gross)
  • ISBN 978-3-319-90526-6
  • Free shipping for individuals worldwide
  • Usually dispatched within 3 to 5 business days.
About this book

This book is the first study of how ‘weird fiction’ emerged from Victorian supernatural literature, abandoning the more conventional Gothic horrors of the past for the contemporary weird tale. It investigates the careers and fiction of a range of the British writers who inspired H. P. Lovecraft, such as Arthur Machen, M. P. Shiel, and John Buchan, to shed light on the tensions between ‘literary’ and ‘genre’ fiction that continue to this day. Weird Fiction in Britain 1880–1939 focuses on the key literary and cultural contexts of weird fiction of the period, including Decadence, paganism, and the occult, and discusses how these later impacted on the seminal American pulp magazine Weird Tales. This ground-breaking book will appeal to scholars of weird, horror and Gothic fiction, genre studies, Decadence, popular fiction, the occult, and Fin-de-Siècle cultural history. 

About the authors

James Machin is a visiting lecturer at the Royal College of Art, UK.   

Reviews

“A compelling argument for the consideration of the weird as a major literary mode. Though it focuses on the late-Victorian and Modernist period, Machin’s study ranges from the eighteenth-century origins of the weird to its continued popularity today. Machin surprises and delights with provocative insights and analyses, manoeuvring dextrously across the fields of canonical, popular, minor, and cult fiction. Weird Fiction in Britain 1880-1939 represents an important and transformational contribution to the scholarly fields of fin-de-siècle literature and pulp fiction.” (Kirsten MacLeod, Newcastle University, UK)

“Weird Fiction in Britain 1880–1939 is a book of groundbreaking importance for the study of the Weird in literature and culture: the first study to look comprehensively at the British context, and an invaluable account of the crucial continuities between the cultures of fin-de-siècle decadence and the Lovecraft/Weird Tales first heyday of the mode. James Machin's accounts of, in particular, Machen, M. P. Shiel, and Buchan are masterful and the book as a whole is filled with fascinating and illuminating material. Nobody interested in this topic can ignore this book's larger argument.” (Adam Roberts, Royal Holloway, University of London, UK)

Table of contents (5 chapters)

Buy this book

eBook £47.99
price for United Kingdom (gross)
  • ISBN 978-3-319-90527-3
  • Digitally watermarked, DRM-free
  • Included format: PDF, EPUB
  • ebooks can be used on all reading devices
  • Immediate eBook download after purchase
Hardcover £59.99
price for United Kingdom (gross)
  • ISBN 978-3-319-90526-6
  • Free shipping for individuals worldwide
  • Usually dispatched within 3 to 5 business days.
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Bibliographic Information

Bibliographic Information
Book Title
Weird Fiction in Britain 1880–1939
Authors
Series Title
Palgrave Gothic
Copyright
2018
Publisher
Palgrave Macmillan
Copyright Holder
The Editor(s) (if applicable) and The Author(s)
eBook ISBN
978-3-319-90527-3
DOI
10.1007/978-3-319-90527-3
Hardcover ISBN
978-3-319-90526-6
Edition Number
1
Number of Pages
IX, 259
Number of Illustrations
5 b/w illustrations
Topics