Larrikins, Rebels and Journalistic Freedom in Australia

Authors: Vine, Josie

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  • The first complete history of Australian journalism culture between two covers
  • Fresh insights into freedom of the news media in Australia using first hand accounts from the journalists who have fought for it
  • A new theoretical framework through which to analyze journalism culture
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eBook 74,89 €
price for Spain (gross)
  • ISBN 978-3-030-61856-8
  • Digitally watermarked, DRM-free
  • Included format: PDF, EPUB
  • ebooks can be used on all reading devices
  • Immediate eBook download after purchase
Hardcover 93,59 €
price for Spain (gross)
  • ISBN 978-3-030-61855-1
  • Free shipping for individuals worldwide
  • Institutional customers should get in touch with their account manager
  • Covid-19 shipping restrictions
  • Usually ready to be dispatched within 3 to 5 business days, if in stock
  • The final prices may differ from the prices shown due to specifics of VAT rules
About this book

Larrikins, Rebels, and Journalistic Freedom is a cultural history of Australian journalism. In a democratic nation where a free news media is not guaranteed, Australian journalism has inherited what could be described as a ‘Larrikin’ tradition to protect its independence. This book mines Australian journalism’s rebelliousness, humor and distinct disrespect for authority in various socio-historical contexts, to explore its determination to maintain professional independence. Beginning with a Larrikin analysis of Australian journalism’s inherited Enlightenment tradition, Dr Josie Vine takes the reader through the Colonial era’s hardships, Federation, two World Wars, the Cold War’s fear and suspicion, the swinging sixties, a Prime Minister’s dismissal, 1980’s neo-liberalism, post-9/11 and, finally, provides a conclusive synthesis of current Australian journalism culture. Throughout, the book highlights the audacious, iconoclastic and determined figure of the Larrikin-journalist, forever pushing boundaries to protect democracy’s cornerstone – freedom of the news media. 

“Book-length histories of Australian journalism are still relatively rare, but what makes this new arrival particularly welcome is the way in which it is structured around an exploration of the ‘Larrikin paradox’. This refers to the fact that although Australian journalism may profess to be ‘professional’ and ‘reputable’, it can also be raucous, unruly and disrespectful in pursuit of what it sees as its democratic purposes. The Larrikin may be a uniquely Australian figure but the paradox is far from confined to Australian journalism (not least because of the influence of erstwhile Australian Rupert Murdoch on journalism in the Anglosphere), and this book should be of considerable interest to those concerned with the means whereby journalism performs its democratic, Fourth Estate role in modern democracies. This is an extremely very well-informed and highly insightful work which ought to appeal equally to those interested in journalism and in Australian politics.” 

Julian Petley, Professor, Brunel University London, UK



About the authors

Dr Josie Vine is Senior Lecturer in the School of Media and Communication at RMIT University, Melbourne, Australia. Her research interests revolve around the cultural history of Australian journalism, and the development of professional ideologies and ethical sensibilities. Her current project is a comparative analysis of the cultural functions of newsrooms in Australia and the UK.

 

Reviews

“Book-length histories of Australian journalism are still relatively rare, but what makes this new arrival particularly welcome is the way in which it is structured around an exploration of the ‘Larrikin paradox’. This refers to the fact that although Australian journalism may profess to be ‘professional’ and ‘reputable’, it can also be raucous, unruly and disrespectful in pursuit of what it sees as its democratic purposes. The Larrikin may be a uniquely Australian figure but the paradox is far from confined to Australian journalism (not least because of the influence of erstwhile Australian Rupert Murdoch on journalism in the Anglosphere), and this book should be of considerable interest to those concerned with the means whereby journalism performs its democratic, Fourth Estate role in modern democracies. This is an extremely very well-informed and highly insightful work which ought to appeal equally to those interested in journalism and in Australian politics.” 

Julian Petley, Professor, Brunel University London, UK

Table of contents (10 chapters)

Table of contents (10 chapters)

Buy this book

eBook 74,89 €
price for Spain (gross)
  • ISBN 978-3-030-61856-8
  • Digitally watermarked, DRM-free
  • Included format: PDF, EPUB
  • ebooks can be used on all reading devices
  • Immediate eBook download after purchase
Hardcover 93,59 €
price for Spain (gross)
  • ISBN 978-3-030-61855-1
  • Free shipping for individuals worldwide
  • Institutional customers should get in touch with their account manager
  • Covid-19 shipping restrictions
  • Usually ready to be dispatched within 3 to 5 business days, if in stock
  • The final prices may differ from the prices shown due to specifics of VAT rules

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Bibliographic Information

Bibliographic Information
Book Title
Larrikins, Rebels and Journalistic Freedom in Australia
Authors
Copyright
2021
Publisher
Palgrave Macmillan
Copyright Holder
The Editor(s) (if applicable) and The Author(s), under exclusive license to Springer Nature Switzerland AG
eBook ISBN
978-3-030-61856-8
DOI
10.1007/978-3-030-61856-8
Hardcover ISBN
978-3-030-61855-1
Edition Number
1
Number of Pages
XV, 245
Number of Illustrations
11 b/w illustrations
Topics