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Civilizational Discourses in Weapons Control

Authors: Mathur, Ritu

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  • Analyzes intersecting discourses on colonialism, nationalism and humanitarianism within the context of weapons control
  • Identifies and challenges the current understanding of time and civilization as a rhetorical resource 
  • Decolonizes practices of arms control and disarmament by contesting the ongoing practices of modernism, ethnocentrism and universalism
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eBook $79.99
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  • ISBN 978-3-030-44943-8
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Hardcover $99.99
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  • ISBN 978-3-030-44942-1
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About this book

This book seeks to decolonize practices of arms control and disarmament. In this endeavor it seeks to problematize our understanding of time and civilization as rhetorical resources. The need for such an undertaking can be premised on the claim that while problems of modernity, ethnocentrism and universalism are now a central concern within the field of international relations, these ideas are scarcely debated or contested within the field of arms control and disarmament. The singular focus on technological innovations and specific policy-oriented agreements in practices of arms control and disarmament appears to stymie the need for such engagements. This book is an invitation to explore intersecting discourses on colonialism, racialism, nationalism and humanitarianism within a historically grounded terrain of weapons control. An understanding of these practices is vital not to prescribe any standards of civilization or exceptionalism in weapons control but to be cognizant through critique of the dangers embedded in any effort at reconstellating the constitutional nuclear order.

About the authors

Ritu Mathur is Associate Professor in the Department of Political Science and Geography at the University of Texas at San Antonio, USA.

Reviews

“Ritu Mathur is an important young scholar offering a vibrant and original postcolonial critique of the stale discourse of international security and arms control that has become ingrown in the West.  She offers the fresh perspective on nuclear weapons policy that we so badly need at this moment when the existing nuclear order is crumbling.  Her writing reminds us that not only white male voices should be heard on nuclear weapons.  Her work is intellectually innovative and important and, if policy-makers will pay attention, practically relevant.”

—      Hugh Gusterson, Professor of Anthropology and International Affairs, George Washington University, USA

“This is an essential book for every student of arms control and disarmament. Ritu Mathur shows why arms control was in decline long before populist strongmen shoved it in the grave. Deploying sly civility and mimesis, Mathur offers the most persuasive explanation for the failure of arms control to globalize. She explains why advocates could not see the limits of its appeal or the limits of it future. If disarmament is to recover its future, it starts here.”

 Aaron Karp, Senior Lecturer, Dept. of Political Science and Geography, Old Dominion University, USA

 "The question of who is considered sufficiently civilized to wield nuclear weapons fundamentally shapes the diplomacy of arms control and disarmament. Yet only a very few scholars have sought to explore just how. In this carefully crafted intervention, Ritu Mathur shows us how historical geographies of race and civilization determine the standards of nuclear civilization. She uncovers the hidden histories of empire and colonial discourse that lie behind the policy science of arms control. In doing so, she shows us what a decolonized debate over nuclear weapons might look like."

Tarak Barkawi, Professor, London School of Economics, UK

“This important new book makes an original contribution on the social technologies of nuclear governance and the unequal worlds they make and by which they are in turn made. Bringing postcolonial insights and decolonial sensibilities to incisive analysis of the architecture of nuclear weapons management, it not only deepens our understanding of the prevailing nuclear order but demands too that we think beyond extant debates around the control and spread of nuclear arms. In so doing, it raises new possibilities for reading against the grain of civilizational narratives congenitally entangled with dominant nuclear discourses and thereby to imagine a fuller range of possibilities toward a world less imperiled by both.”

 J. Marshall Beier, Professor of Political Science, McMaster University, Canada

 

Table of contents (6 chapters)

Table of contents (6 chapters)

Buy this book

eBook $79.99
price for USA
  • ISBN 978-3-030-44943-8
  • Digitally watermarked, DRM-free
  • Included format: PDF, EPUB
  • ebooks can be used on all reading devices
  • Immediate eBook download after purchase
Hardcover $99.99
price for USA
  • ISBN 978-3-030-44942-1
  • Free shipping for individuals worldwide
  • Immediate ebook access, if available*, with your print order
  • Usually dispatched within 3 to 5 business days.

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Bibliographic Information

Bibliographic Information
Book Title
Civilizational Discourses in Weapons Control
Authors
Copyright
2020
Publisher
Palgrave Macmillan
Copyright Holder
The Editor(s) (if applicable) and The Author(s)
eBook ISBN
978-3-030-44943-8
DOI
10.1007/978-3-030-44943-8
Hardcover ISBN
978-3-030-44942-1
Edition Number
1
Number of Pages
XVI, 277
Topics

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